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Annual Trauma Workshop

SPONSORED BY THE OFFICE OF POSTGRADUATE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS OF ST. JOHNíS UNIVERSITY, PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT
Co-sponsored by NAAP

Breaking the Trauma-Bond Between Your Patient and Their Family: An Object Relations Approach to Resistance in Treatment

Workshop is led by Dr. David Celani

Date: Sunday, April 18, 2021, 10am - 4:30pm  

Location: Virtual participation only.
Virtual participation is conducted via audio/video or audio mode only (with minimal technical requirements)

To Register for this workshop, please complete the Registration Form

CONTINUING EDUCATION

9.5 CEs for NYS Licensed Social Workers, Mental Health Counselors, Marriage & Family Therapists and Psychologists --  approved by Amedco
6.
5 APA based CEs for non-NYS Licensed Psychologists & other non-NYS mental health professionals
--  approved by St. John's University
6.5 CEs
for NYS Licensed Psychoanalysts --  approved by NAAP
9.5 PDU (for educators, legal professionals, psychoanalytic candidates in training)
-- approved by the CE Committee of the Object Relations Institute for Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis

NB: To claim the CEs, the participants need to participate in this educational activity via the video-audio mode (and not only via audio), to ensure active participation
 For full information on Continuing Education, follow the link HERE

This workshop will address one of the most frustrating and often repeated events in a psychotherapistís daily practice, when a client, who seems to be making progress, suddenly begins to aggressively defend his family of origin and angrily abandons treatment. This sudden resistance to therapy is provoked when the patient realizes that s/he is pulling away from their family of origin, both internal and external, and cannot imagine surviving alone.

W.R.D. Fairbairn recognized that ďattachment to bad objectsĒ was a formidable source of resistance to treatment: as the patient develops emotionally in relation to the therapist, their unconscious bond to the parents who neglected them in childhood is threatened by the new relationship, and by the discoveries inherent in the treatment. The loss of their dysfunctional family appears to the patient to be catastrophic because they will have to confront the reality of their mistreatment in childhood. These unconscious loyalties are harbored in two mostly dissociated pairs of ego structures that developed from relational events between parent and child. These were (and are) intolerable for the child or even the adult to remember. Our speaker will demonstrate how to identify and respond to the two pairs of unconscious structures along with the patientís developmental deficits, while minimizing resistance and early termination.

Registered participants will receive the Workshop Handout prepared by Dr. Celani, entitled "Fairbairnís Metaphor of the Human Mind and the Trauma Bond."

                    

The Extreme Dependency of the Child on Mother and the Consequences of Rejection
Fairbairn was one of the first analytic writers to recognize the devastating impact that maternal rejection has on the development of the childís personality. He explained how the childís absolute dependency on their mother makes rejection of their needs a traumatic event. The emotionally deprived child cannot continue to develop and explore the world because they would have to draw their attention away from their mother to whom they cling in the hope of love and protection that might be forthcoming. All other developmental tasks are thus put on hold, and they begin to fall behind their peers.

The Development of the Unconscious, the Emergence of Sub-Egos, and the Hidden Attachments that Prevent Separation from Bad Objects
This session will focus on dissociated internalizations of the toxic relational events that repeatedly occurred in the childís life. We will explore how such dissociated memories in relation to the rejecting parent create a sub-self that relates to memories of the rejecting parent in the childís unconscious. A second pair of unconscious structures develop within the inner world that are designed to keep the childís hope alive in the most rejecting and abusive families. This second split-off view of self and object is developed from the fantasy that the parent contains an untapped storehouse of love. This view of the parent gives the child hope for the future and this libidinal sub self is ferociously invested in discovering the path to this hidden love.

A Fairbairnian Approach to Change:  Minimizing Patient Resistance, While Maximizing the Therapistís  ďIntrojectabilityĒ
This section of the presentation will focus on identifying and responding to the split-off structures that will emerge during the treatment process. We will also examine the process of developing a clinical narrative that subtly focuses on early relational failures. Premature discussion of the many failures that the patient experienced can produce resistance, as the patient cannot yet accept them because they further separate him from his attachment objects. We will look at a clinical narrative that is designed to help the central ego to grow, and to get used to relating to an external object that operates as a new and good object. Over time, the patientís increasingly strong central ego will allow them to face the painful, neglectful and abandoning reality of childhood that has heretofore been successfully dissociated.

Understanding and Tolerating Patient Resistance, and Repetition Compulsions
Fairbairnís model is a powerful explanatory tool that sees resistance as a clinging to unconscious relationships in the unconscious structures. We will see how repetition compulsions are the acting-out of internalized relationships with new external objects (including the therapist) and how these offer a window of understanding to the patientís unconscious. The calm and matter-of-fact discussions between the therapist as the good object and the patientís central ego can accumulate in the patientís central ego. In time, they can surpass the intense attachments between the split-off structures that have guided the patientís life into repeated futile patterns. Typical clinical narratives between patient and therapist will be modeled to illustrate the surprising potency of this approach.

LEARNING POINTS:

At the end of this educational activity, its participants will be able to:
1) Apply Fairbairn's understanding of the child's absolute dependence on its maternal object to analyze your patient's unresolved dependencies and psychological underdevelopment.
2) Apply you understanding of child's dependence to analyze patient's damaged, incomplete and unintegrated sense of self.
3) Analyze the emergence of attraction to or attachments to destructive external objects that seem to be discordant with the patient's self-presentation as the actions of  split-off sub-egos that are unknown parts of the patient's personality.
4) Analyze transference as the projection of inner structures on to the analyst, who then is transformed into a bad object, and rendered impotent.
5) Apply their understanding of attachment to bad objects to the patient's strong emotional bond to the very parents that abused or neglected them in childhood. This attachment allows avoidance of the external world, and offers the patient an illusory hope of developmental closure.
6) Analyze patient's dissociated selves by gradually introducing the conscious central ego to events of parental empathic failure that actually occurred, but only emerge gradually and obliquely.
7) Utilize creation of a "casual" therapeutic narrative that emphasizes the patient's reactions to these remembered but minimized or excused events.
8) Utilize their awareness of the extreme impact of early empathic failures on the patient's psychological development to gradually co-create a model of their childhood that becomes acceptable to their central ego.
8) Utilize the patient's ability to internalize external objects to create an internal conflict between the preexisting internalized bad objects and the new internalized analyst who is a good object.
9) Analyze the patients enactments in the therapeutic sessions or repetition compulsions with external objects as projections of the inner structures onto external objects.
10) Utilize the emphasis on parental failures rather than confront the patient's unrealistic, almost delusional (split-off) visions of the "goodness" of their objects in order to minimize resistance.

Schedule of the Workshop's Sessions:

Morning Session:  10am - 12:45pm
Topics covered:
The Extreme Dependency of the Child on Mother and the Consequences of Rejection 

The Development of the Unconscious, the Emergence of Sub-Egos, and the Hidden Attachments that Prevent Separation from Bad Objects 
Lunch: 12:45pm - 1:20pm 
Afternoon Session:  1:20pm - 3:50pm 
Topics covered:
A Fairbairnian Approach to Change:  Minimizing Patient Resistance, While Maximizing the Therapistís  ďIntrojectabilityĒ
Understanding and Tolerating Patient Resistance, and Repetition Compulsions
General Q & A: 4:00pm - 4:30pm

Readings in preparation to this workshop (mandatory for those obtaining the CEs) - will be sent to the registered participants in PDF formats:
a) Dr. Celaniís workshop handout ďFairbairn's Metaphor of Human MindĒ (15 pages);
b) Celani, D. P. (2010). Fairbairnís Object Relations Theory in the Clinical Setting. Intro Chapter (17 pages); Chapter One (40 pages); Chapter Two (32 pages).

To qualify for 4.25 CE hours assigned for preparation to this workshop, in addition to 5.25 CE contact hours, please fill out the following form related to fulfilling the reading assignment requirement: https://forms.gle/cS2jJyQ4oKURDUgX9

Other bibliography:
Celani, D. P. (2001). Working with Fairbairn's ego structures. Contemporary Psychoanalysis, 37, 391-416.
Celani, D. P. (2005). Leaving home: How to separate from your difficult family. New York: Columbia University Press.
Celani, D. P. (2007). A structural analysis of the obsessional character: A Fairbairnian perspective. American Journal of Psychoanalysis, 67(2), 119-140.
Celani, D. P. (2010). Fairbairn's object relations theory in the clinical setting. New York: Columbia University Press.
Celani, D. P. (2014a). A Fairbairnian structural analysis of the narcissistic personality disorder. Psychoanalytic Review, 101, 385-409.
Celani, D. P. (2014b). Revising Fairbairn's structural theory. In G. Clarke & D. Scharff, eds., Fairbairn and the object relations tradition (pp. 397-409). London: Karnac
Celani, D. P. (2016). Fairbairn's theory of change. Psychoanalytic Review, 103(3), 341-370.
Celani, D. P. (2020). Applying Fairbairnís Object Relations theory to the psychological development of Anders Brevik. Psychoanalytic Review, 107(4), 337-365.
Ogden, T. H. (2019). Why read Fairbairn? International Journal of Psycho-analysis, 91, 101-118.
Skolnick, N. J. (2006). What's a good object to do? Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 16(1), 1-27.
Skolnick, N.J., (2014). The analyst as a good object: a Fairbairnian perspective. Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 16, 1-28.
Seinfeld, J. (1990). The bad object. Northvale, N.J.: Aronson.

Short Bio of the Workshop Leader:
David P. Celani, PhD, is a licensed psychologist who practiced for more than twenty-five years in Burlington, Vermont. In treatment, he focused on his patientsí ďattachment to bad objectsĒ, which manifested through their inability to separate from parents, friends, or marital partners who demeaned, criticized, or abused them. Celani now presents workshops throughout the United States on Object Relations theory. His books with Columbia University Press include Fairbairnís Object Relations Theory in the Clinical SettingThe Illusion of Love: Why the Battered Woman Returns to Her Abuser
, and Leaving Home: How to Separate From Your Difficult Family.

Registration and Fees:

____ Early Bird registration (before March 11, 2021) - $50 regular/ $35 grad students & candidates/ $15 undergrad students. If CEs are requested - there is an additional fee of $25 (can be paid on the day of the conference or in advance).

____ Pre-registration discount (March 18 Ė April 17, 2021) - $60 regular/ $45 grad students & candidates/ $20 undergrad students. If CEs are requested - there is an additional fee of $25 (can be paid on the day of the conference or in advance).

____ Registration 'at the door' (on April 18, 2021) - $70 regular/ $55 grad students & candidates/ $25 undergrad students. If CEs are requested - there is an additional fee of $25 (can be paid on the day of the conference or in advance).

To Register for this workshop, please complete the Registration Form

To receive CE certificates for the actual hours attended - please request them at the time of registration or any time prior to beginning of the conference. CE certificate fee: $25 (in addition to the registration fees). No fees charged for PD (Professional Development) certificates from ORI.

Special scholarships for undergraduate/graduate students, retired SW practitioners, as well as for group registration, are available. Inquire by email to Admin@ORINYC.org or at 646-522-1056.

To register: fill out the registration from (follow the link to REGISTRATION) and send it to ORI Administrator via e-mail: admin@orinyc.org  or adminorinyc@gmail.com or Fax @ (718) 785-3270; or call 646-522-1056 (Dr. Inna Rozentsvit, ORI Administrator and Program Director) to discuss any questions re: registration.

Please send your payment (mail only checks and money orders, paid to ORI) to: ORI Administrator; 75-15 187th Street; Fresh Meadows, NY, 11366-1725. Credit cards / PayPal payments are accepted - see below:
You can pay via PayPal (www.paypal.com); our ID/ handle is: adminorinyc@gmail.com) OR use the link: Paypal.me/ORINYC (please chose to "pay" or "send money," not to "request" the payment)

To use the credit card, you can pay via Square: https://checkout.square.site/buy/KHFBE5Z3ZS2WHJOZY62UVHXI  (pre-registration) or https://checkout.square.site/merchant/47M38FNTYG0RA/checkout/AFMBVWPURNGSDXEYPMESNDBL (to pay on the day of the event).

To pay for CE certificates - use the link to Square processing here: CE Certificate Fee  OR use the PayPal link: Paypal.me/ORINYC (then, chose to "pay" or "send money" and type in $25.00).
You also can
call the administrator with full credit card information, to process the credit card over the phone: 646-522-1056.

 

CANCELLATION POLICY:
Refund in full is offered for cancellations made before April 18th, 2021. No refunds for cancellations made on or after April 18th, 2021 (but credit can be applied for any of the educational events offered at ORI in 2021 or further on).

 

CONTINUING EDUCATION:


This program was organized in conjunction with and approved for APA Continuing Education Credits by the St. John's University Office of Postgraduate Professional Development Programs.  St. John's University Office of Postgraduate Professional Development Programs is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The University maintains responsibility for this program and its content. 6.5 hours.

 

Certificates for CEs for NYS Licensed Social Workers, Mental Health Counselors, and Marriage & Family Therapists (9.5 hrs) are approved by AMEDCO.
New York Board for Social Workers (NY SW) 
Amedco SW CPE is recognized by the New York State Education Departmentís State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #0115. 9.5 hours.
New York Board for Mental Health Counselors (NY MHC)    Amedco is recognized by the New York State Education Departmentís State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors. #MHC-0061. 9.5 hours.
New York Board for Marriage & Family Therapists (NY MFT) 
Amedco is recognized by the New York State Education Departmentís State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed marriage and family therapists. #MFT-0032. 9.5 hours.
New York Board for Psychology (NY PSY) 
Amedco is recognized by the New York State Education Departmentís State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0031. 9.5 hours.


Certificates for CEs for NYS Licensed Psychoanalysts (6.5 hrs) are approved by NAAP.
National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis (NAAP) is recognized by the New York State Education Departmentís State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an Approved Provider of continuing education for licensed psychoanalysts. #P-0019.

 

Certificates for post-graduate training in psychoanalysis and/or psychoanalytic psychotherapy (9.5 hrs) are approved by ORI CE Committee, and will be available, as per request.

 

Please note that 9.5 CE hours for this event includes 4.25 hours of required readings (which will be supplied to all registered participants).
You will be able to claim the CEs only for actually attended hours and time spent reviewing necessary materials prior to the event.

 

Please review full CE information HERE.

 

 

Please request your CEs and PDUs at the time of registration. CE certification fee: $25 (paid in addition to the conference attendance fee).

 

Pay the CE certificate fee via PayPal, at Paypal.me/ORINYC or contact ORI Conference Administrator by email (adminorinyc@gmail.com) or by phone (646-522-1056).

To Register for this workshop, please complete the Registration Form and pay the registration fee or contact the Program Director at 646-522-1056 or via email at adminorinyc@gmail.com


Other Suggested Readings on the topic:

Armstrong-Perlman, E.M., (1991). The allure of the bad object. Free Association, 2, 343-356.
Buckley, P. (Ed.). (1986). Essential papers in psychoanalysis. Essential papers on object relations. New York University Press.

Celani, D. P. (2014b). Revising Fairbairn's structural theory. In G. Clarke & D. Scharff, (Eds.), Fairbairn and the object relations tradition (pp. 397-409). London: Karnac.
Celani, D. P. (2014a). A Fairbairnian structural analysis of the narcissistic personality disorder. Psychoanalytic Review, 101, 385-409.
Celani, D.P. (2016). Fairbairn's theory of change. Psychoanalytic Review, 103(3), 341-370.

Celani, D.P. (2020). Applying Fairbairnís Object Relations theory to the psychological development of Anders Breivik. Psychoanalytic Review, 107(4), 337-365.
Diaz, Juno, Waiting for spider man, New Yorker, 11/20/17, p.17. (example of Libidinal Ego creating a Exciting Object)
Fairbairn, W.R.D. (1952). Psychoanalytic Studies of the Personality.  London. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
Fairbairn, W.R.D. (1958). On the nature and aims of psycho-analytical treatment. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 39, 374-385.
Greenson, R.R. (1971). A dream while drowning. In: Explorations in Psychoanalysis (pp. 415-423). Madison, CT:  International Universities Press. 1978. (example of internalized ideal object)
Harrison, K. (1997). The kiss. New York: Random House. (memoir of a rejected child and her
extreme attachment to bad object parents)
Mitchell, S.A. (2000). Relationality: From attachment to intersubjectivity. Hillsdale, NJ: The Analytic Press.

Ogden, T.H. (2010). Why read Fairbairn? International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 91, 101-108.
Schafer, R. (1998). Authority, evidence, and knowledge in the psychoanalytic relationship, In O. Renick (Ed.), Knowledge and authority in the psychoanalytic relationship (pp.227-244). Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson.
Seinfeld, J. (1990). The bad object . Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson.
Skolnick, N.J., (2006). The analyst as a good object: a Fairbairnian perspective. Psychoanalytic Dialogues, 16, 1-28.
Skolnick, N.J., & Scharff, D.E. (Eds) (1998). Fairbairn, then and now. Hillsdale, NJ: Analytic Press.    
Skolnick, N. J. (2014). The analyst as a good object: A Fairbairnian perspective. In G. Clarke & D. E. Scharff (Eds.), Fairbairn and the object relations tradition (pp. 249-262). London: Karnac.     


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