Go to WELCOME page BULLETIN BOARD  May Calendar for Memorial Day CALENDAR of EVENTS   REGISTRATION FORM  ORI ACADEMIC PRESS  

QUOTE of the DAY  DR. JEFFREY SEINFELD MEMORIAL     PSYCHOANALYTIC LICENSE

Infant Observational Research and Its Impact on Psychoanalytic Theory and Technique

Mandatory Elective course for Year 3 and 4 of the Full Training in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis and a part of the Parent-Child Development Program at ORI (can be also taken as an individual post-graduate certificate course; no pre-requisites). Earns 12.5 hrs of post-graduate training certificate

Instructor: Ann Rose Simon, LCSW

Spring of 2016-2017 Academic Year - Dates/ times - TBA

Location: 1225 Park Avenue; 1225 Park Avenue, Suite 1E; New York, NY 10128 or via Virtual Participation

Theories about child development changed over the past fifty years as researchers and theorists began to observe infants and parents closely and to base their theories on these actual observations of infants and of the parent-infant dyad.  This course will help all professionals working with children and adults to become familiar with the major infant research projects and the theories of development that have emerged from this research.  The course will explore the impact that infant research has had on accepted theories of child development, especially those of Sigmund Freud, Melanie Klein and Donald W. Winnicott.  Participants will explore how changing theories of child development have influenced psychoanalytic techniques, educational approaches, and therapeutic and educational interventions to strengthen parent-child bonds and relationships. In addition, they will come to understand various research protocols and critically assess the validity of the research studied in the class.

Bibliography: 

Balint, Michael.  (1969)  The Basic Fault:  Therapeutic Aspects of Regression.  Evanston, Illinois:  Northwester University Press

Beebe, Beatrice. Infant Research and Adult Treatment:  Co-Constructing Interactions. 

Cozolino, Louis.  The Neuroscience of Human Relationships:  Attachment and the Developing Social Brain.  New York and London:  W.W. Norton & Company.

Gedo, John.  (1999)  The Evolution of Psychoanalysis:  Contemporary Theory and Practice.  New York:  Other Press

Lichtenberg, J. (1983) Psychoanalysis and Infant Research.  Hillsdale, NJ: Analytic Press

Mahler, Margaret.  Fred Pine and Anni Bergman.  (1975)  The Psychological Birth of the Human Infant:  Symbiosis and Individuation.  New York:  Basic Books, Inc.

Stern, Daniel N. (1985)  The Interpersonal World of the Infant:  A View from Psychoanalysis and Developmental Psychology.  New York:  Basic Books, Inc.

Weekly Reading Assignments:

Class #1:

Gedo, John.  (1999). The Evolution of Psychoanalysis:  Contemporary Theory and Practice.  New York:  Other Press.  Chapter 8, “The Theory of Development and the Yield of Infant Observation.” (Copies of this chapter will be distributed in class.)

Balint, Michael.  (1969)  The Basic Fault:  Therapeutic Aspects of Regression.  Evanston, Illinois:  Northwestern University Press.  Chapters 1-2 (pp. 3-10) Chapter 7 (pp. 35-39), Chapter 11 (pp. 59-63), Chapter 14-16 (pp. 79-103), Chapter 24 (pp. 159-172)

Class #2:

Mahler, Margaret.  Fred Pine and Anni Bergman.  (1975)  The Psychological Birth of the Human Infant:  Symbiosis and Individuation.  New York:  Basic Books, Inc. Introduction and Chapters 1-3 (pp. ix-51) (focus on pp. ix-16 and pp. 39-51), Chapters 4-7 (pp. 52-120)

Class #3:

Stern, Daniel N. (1985). The Interpersonal World of the Infant:  A View from Psychoanalysis and Developmental Psychology.  New York:  Basic Books, Inc. Chapters 1-4 (pp. 3-68)

Class #4:

Stern, Daniel N. (1985). The Interpersonal World of the Infant:  A View from Psychoanalysis and Developmental Psychology.  New York:  Basic Books, Inc. Chapters 5-8 (pp. 69-182)

Class #5:

Lichtenberg, J. (1983). Psychoanalysis and Infant Research.  Hillsdale, NJ: Analytic Press. Part I, pp. 3-39 (with focus on pp. 17-27); Part II, pp 43-94 (with focus on pp. 43-55 and 68-72).

Class #6:

Lichtenberg, J. (1983). Psychoanalysis and Infant Research.  Hillsdale, NJ: Analytic Press. Part III, pp. 97-147 (with focus on pp. 97-121); Part IV, Ch. 13, pp. 214-239.

Class #7:

Cozolino, L. ().The Neuroscience of Human Relationships:  Attachment and the Developing Social Brain.  New York and London:  W.W. Norton & Company. Part I, pp. 3-33; Part III, pp. 81-150.

Class #8:

Cozolino, L. ().The Neuroscience of Human Relationships:  Attachment and the Developing Social Brain.  New York and London:  W.W. Norton & Company. Part IV, pp. 153-209.

Class #9:

Beebe, B. (). Infant Research and Adult Treatment:  Co-Constructing Interactions.  Chapters 2, 3, 5 and 8.

Written Assignments: 

On the 3rd and 7th meeting of the class, hand in a type-written two-page response to your reading.  In each paper include your answers to two of the following questions, choosing different questions in each paper:

1.      What did you find particularly interesting about the reading?

2.      How did the reading influence or change your own thinking about your work with patients?

3.      How did the reading influence or change your own thinking about your concept of psychoanalysis and/or human development?

4.      What did you disagree with in the reading and why?

5.      What questions do you have about the reading?

6.      How did the reading open your own thinking on emotional issues you may be grappling with in your own life?

Bio: Ann Rose Simon, LCSW, is a psychoanalyst in private practice in Manhattan and Westchester.  She is an officer on the Board of Directors of the Object Relations Institute and NPAP and a member of the Steering Committee of the Neuropsychoanalytic Clinical Study Center of NPAP.  She is a fellow in the Anni Bergman Parent Infant Program and is affiliated with the Rose Kennedy Center for Babies, Toddlers and Families of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

Contact Ann Rose Simon, LCSW by phone 212 426-8012 or email at ARSimonmsw@AOL.com

For registration form, click HERE

For more information, contact ORI administrator Dr. Inna Rozentsvit at 646-522-1056.


   http://www.ctd.northwestern.edu/   Visit ORI's YouTube Channel, ObjectRelations2009, to view the highlights of our Annual Conferences:

       Thumbnail  2013 Conference - on Countertransference, Regret, Aggression, and Their Vicissitudes

         Self-Sabotage - from Jungian, Kleinian, and Fairbairnian Perspectives  2012 Conference on Self-Sabotage: Jungian, Kleinian,  and Fairbairnian Perspectives.  

  2011 Annual 20th Anniversary Conference on Dialectics of Mortality and Immortality: Time as a Persecutory vs. a Holding Object

2010 Annual Conference on Psychoanalysis & Spirituality

2009 Annual Conference on Eroticized Demonic Object

Visit ORI's YouTube Channel, ObjectRelations2009, to view NEW mini-video series "The Object Relations View"

Intro to the Object Relations Thinking and Clinical Technique - with Dr. Kavaler-Adler (part 1).

Projective Identification (part 2)

Time as an Object (part 3)

Self Sabotage - (part 4)

        Fear of Success (part 5)

        Mourning, Developmental vs. Pathological  (part 6)

        Bad Objects and Loyalty to Bad Objects (part 7)

        Demon-lover Complex  (part 8)

        Psychic Regret (part 9)

        Klein-Winnicott Dialectic  (part 10)

        Depression: The Object Relations View (part 11)

        Anxiety: The Object Relations View (part 12)

        Eating Disorders: The Object Relations View (part 13)

        Narcissism: The Object Relations View (part 14)

        Female Creativity and the Internal Father (part 15)

        Psychic Dialectic: The Object Relations View (part 16)

        Writing Blocks: The Object Relations View (part 17)

        Internal Editor and Internal Saboteur: The Object Relations View (part 18)

  Join Us on FACEBOOK

  Support Our Cause on FACEBOOK: Support Mental Health Education!

Object Relations Institute for Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis (Training Foundation) is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit educational organization. EIN # 133697333. Your donations are tax-deductible, while they help tremendously to keep down the costs of our training and to continue to offer free educational activities and events. To contribute, please use PayPal.Me/ORINYC for PayPal payments or the button below, for credit card payments:


 

Please note - Mail correspondence to: ORI Administrator, 75-15 187 Street, Fresh Meadows, NY, 11366-1725
Tel: 646.522.0387 and 646-522-1056   Fax: 718.785.3270  Email: admin@ORINYC.org and adminorinyc@gmail.com
Inquiries about psychotherapy and psychoanalysis training: DrKavalerAdler@gmail.com and /or dr.innarozentsvit@orinyc.org


Disclaimer: This site and its services, including the contents of this site are for informational purposes only. It does not
provide medical or any other health care advice, diagnosis or treatment.   

Copyright © 2000 Object Relations Institute, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Website created by MindMendMedia (last updated on 06/21/2016).