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Description: Description: The 2012 Conference

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    Neurobiology for Psychotherapists & Psychoanalysts Courses at ORI 

    2015-2016

    Neuropsychoanalysis: Attachment and Object Relations through the Lens of Neurobiology and Brain Mapping

    - with Inna Rozentsvit, M.D., PhD

1st Trimester of the year 2 of the Two-Year and the Full Training in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis, as well as the Neuropsychoanalysis and the Parent-Child Development Programs (can be also taken as an individual post-graduate certificate course; no pre-requisites)

Post-graduate continuing education credits/ hrs earned after completion of this course: 12.5.

Dates: October 8, 2015 - December 17, 2015, Thursdays, 8:15-9:30pm.

Tuition: $450/ 10-week course (can be paid in 2 installments, as per request). Inquire about scholarships for graduate students.

Place: In-person - 26 W 9th Street (between 5th & 6th Ave), 2C; NYC, 10011 and Virtually (with minimal technical requirements or via viewing the films of the classes)

 

The intention [of this project] is to furnish a psychology that shall be a natural science. — S. Freud, 1895, "Project for a Scientific Psychology."

We must recollect that all of our provisional ideas in psychology will presumably one day be based on an organic substructure. — Sigmund Freud, “On Narcissism.” 

The deficiencies in our description would probably vanish if we were already in a position to replace the psychological terms with physiological or chemical ones.…We may expect [physiology and chemistry] to give the most surprising information and we cannot guess what answers it will return in a few dozen years of questions we have put to it. They may be of a kind that will blow away the whole of our artificial structure of hypothesis. — Sigmund Freud, “Beyond the Pleasure Principle.” 

He who has eyes to see and ears to hear becomes convinced that mortals can keep no secret. If their lips are silent, they gossip with their fingertips; betrayal forces itself through every pore. — S. Freud, 1905, "The Case of Hysteria."

The brain is the organ of destiny. It holds within its humming mechanism secrets that will determine the future of the human race. Wilder Penfield, 1963, "The Second Career."

Significance of understanding of neurobiology for those who dedicate their professional life to psychoanalysis was recognized by the neurologist/ neuropathologist Sigmund Freud at the very birth of this profession. One can be fascinated how (without PET scans and fMRIs) he could picture the structure of the mind, while having only unsophisticated fish brains at hand. In his 1895 letter to W. Fliess, S. Freud wrote:  I am tormented by two aims: to examine what shape the theory of mental functioning takes if one introduces quantitative consideration, a sort of economics of nerve forces; and, second, to peel off from psychopathology a gain for normal psychology. These ideas of the founder of psychoanalysis about the Brain-Mind dynamic functioning had evolved now into different merging areas of interest, such as social neurology, evolutionary neuroscience, interpersonal neuroscience, mindfulness, neuropsychoanalysis, etc.

In this course, we will become acquainted with main Brain-Mind phenomena and with neural processes involved in memory, emotions, and social interactions. We will look into neural and neurophysiological processes of attachment, trauma, plasticity, and integration. “What fires together – wires together!”

We will look into connections of human Brain’s anatomy (which is very specific to our species) with the wholesome and creative functioning of the Mind (which differs from one individual to another).

SYLLABUS - IS WORK IN PROGRESS, but it definitely will have the following themes/ topics:

Session 1 and 2: Attachment phenomenon, which is important to understand developmental approach to personality/ behavior /trauma.
Sessions 3, 4, and 5: Brain-mind mechanisms that make us who we are, and which can be altered/ used to achieve a change (if needed) or to solidify/ strengthen prior achievements, etc. This section will include: neuroplasticity, neurointegration, laterality, connectomes, neuro-networking, fire together- wire together, etc.
Sessions 6 and 7: Attachment-based behavior/ parenting/ trauma work.
Session 8: Mindfulness approach in everyday life and in trauma (developmental, relational, etc.).
Sessions 9 and 10: Neurointegration approach in mind-body disorders, developmental disorders, and trauma work - with children and adults.

At the end of this course, participants will be able to:

1) Identify the brain-mind mechanisms of “normal” and “pathological” functioning (e.g., neuroplasticity, neurointegration, neurogenesis, brain/mind laterality, and “fire together-wire together”, synaptic pruning, and other phenomena), and to apply this knowledge about neurobiology to "cases" offered by the instructor or the participants.

2) Assess the levels of brain-mind functioning based on the “triune brain” phenomenon, and in turn, understand the level at which each individual client can be reached at therapeutically. Role-play will be implemented to reach this objective.

3) Discuss clinical cases utilizing Brain-Mind dynamic functioning model.

4) Demonstrate the concept of “mindful” therapy approach to working with developmental and/or relational trauma. Role-play will be implemented to reach this objective.

Some References on Attachment:

Ainsworth, M. D. S. (1968), Object relations, dependency, and attachment: A theoretical review of the infant mother relationship. Child Development, 40, 969-1025.

Ainsworth, M. D. S. (1982). Attachment: Retrospect and prospect. In C. M. Parkes & J. Stevenson-Hinde (Eds.), The place of attachment in human behavior (pp. 3-30). New York: Basic Books.

Ainsworth, M. D. S. (1989). Attachments beyond infancy. American Psychologist, 44, 709-716.

Ainsworth, M. D. S., & Bell, S. M. (1970). Attachment, exploration, and separation: Illustrated by the behavior of one-year-olds in a strange situation. Child Development, 41(1), 49-67.

Ainsworth, M. D. S., & Bowlby, J. (1991). An ethological approach to personality development. American Psychologist, 46, 331-341.

Ainsworth, M. D. S., Blehar, M. C., Waters, E., & Wall, S. (1978). Patterns of attachment: A psychological study of the strange situation. Hillsdale, N.J.: Erlbaum.

Bowlby, 3. (1940). The influence of early environment in the development of neurosis and neurotic character. International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, XXI, 1-25.

Bowlby, J. (1944). Forty-four juvenile thieves: Their characters and home lives. International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, XXV, 19-52.

Bowlby, J. (1958). The nature of the child’s tie to his mother. International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, XXXIX, 1-23.

Bowlby, J. (1959). Separation anxiety. International Journal of Psycho-Analysts, XLI, 1-25.

Bowlby, J. (1960). Grief and mourning in infancy and early childhood. The Psychoanalytic Study of the Child, VX, 3-39.

Bowlby, J. (1969). Attachment and loss, Vol. 1: Attachment. New York: Basic Books.

Bowlby, J. (1973). Attachment and loss, Vol. 2: Separation. New York: Basic Books.

Bowlby, J. (I980a). Attachment and loss, Vol. 3: Loss, sadness and depression. New York: Basic Books.

Bowlby, J. (1988). A secure base: Parent-child attachment and healthy human development. New York: Basic Books.

Buchheim, A., George, C., & West, M. (2003). The Adult Attachment Projective (AAP) - Psychometric properties and new research. Psychotherapie Psychosomatik Medizinische Psychologie (Psychosomatics Psychotherapy Medical Psychology), 53, 419-427.

Cassidy J. & P. R. Shaver (Eds.) (1999). Handbook of attachment: Theory, research, and clinical applications. New York: Guilford Press.

Damasio, A. (1999). The feeling of what happens: Body and emotion in the making of consciousness. New York: Harcourt Brace.

Fonagy, P., Target, M., Gergely, G., & Jurist, E. J.  (2002). Affect regulation, mentalization and the development of the Self. New York: Other Press.

Holmes, J. (2001).  In search of the secure base. London: Routledge.

Main , M., & Goldwyn, R. (1998). Adult attachment classification system. Unpublished manuscript. University of California: Berkeley, CA.

Mikulincer, M., & Shaver, P. R. (2001).  Attachment theory and intergroup bias: Evidence that priming the  secure base schema attenuates negative reactions to out-groups. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 81, 97-115.

Schore, A. (2003).   Affect regulation and the repair of the self.  New York:   W.W. Norton and Co,

Schore, A. (2003).  Affect dysregulation and disorders of the self.  New York:   W.W. Norton and Co.

Shaver, P., & Mikulincer, M. (2002).  Attachment-related psychodynamics.  Attachment and Human Development, 4, 133-161.

Siegel, D. J. (1999). The developing mind: How relationships and the brain interact to shape who we are.  New York: Guilford Press.

Stern, D. N. (1985). The interpersonal world of the infant: A view from psychoanalysis and developmental psychology. New York: Basic Books.

Winnicott, D. W. (1960). The theory of the parent-infant relationship. In: The Maturational Processes and the Facilitating Environment (pp.37-55). New York: International Universities Press.

For some Resources on Neurobiology @ ORI - visit pages on Neuro-Psycho-Education; Neurobiology and Psychoanalysis: Thoughts, Ideas, and Controversies; Neurobiology Essays by Inna Rozentsvit; and Parent-Child Development Program.

To register, please fill out the registration page and mail it with tuition  payment to: ORI; 75-15 187 Str, Fresh Meadows, NY, 11366-1725.

For more information, please email admin@orinyc.org and/ or call 646-522-1056.

 


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     2014-2015

The following 2014 courses on "applied" neurobiology are included in the curriculum of the Parent-Child Development Program at ORI:

Trimester 1 Love Before First Sight: Neurobiology of Parent-Child Bonds, the Primer of Human Relationships, I (with Inna Rozentsvit, M.D., PhD)

Trimester 2 Love Before First Sight: Neurobiology of Parent-Child Bonds, the Primer of Human Relationships, II (with Inna Rozentsvit, M.D., PhD)

Trimester 3 Love Before First Sight: Neurobiology of Parent-Child Bonds, the Primer of Human Relationships, III (with Inna Rozentsvit, M.D., PhD)

Main topics addressed (from introductory through clinical application): **Parent-child bonds as a template for interpersonal connections; ** How Winnicottian ideas about human capacities (for love, play, to be alone) and maternal preoccupation can be understood neurobiologically; ** Environmental influences, external and internal (hormonal and others), which shape these connections and shape parental behavior and behavior of children; ** Mind mapping and functional brain imaging related to parent-child connections and their vicissitudes; ** Neuro-psychopathology and health of parent-child bonds.


2013 - 2014

5/07/13 - 6/18/13 (Tuesdays, 7:45pm-9:15pm) – Neurobiology and Brain Mapping for Psychotherapists and Psychoanalysts (Inna Rozentsvit, M.D., PhD) (NEW). Location: 41 E 11th Street; 4th Floor; NYC, 10003.

Main topics addressed: **Neuroplasticity and Neurointegration; ** Mind-Brain-Body connections and the concepts of the Self/ Id/ Ego/ Superego and their representations in the brain; ** Mindfulness and functional brain maps; ** Brain "lesions" and their meaning for dealing with the Mind. There are no pre-requisites for the course and everyone interested in understanding the brain better is welcome!

5/9/13-6/20/13 (Thursdays, 10:15 am-11:30 am) Love Before First Sight: Neurobiology of Parent-Child Bonds, the Primer of Human Relationships (part of the Parent-Child Development Program @ ORI, but can be taken as an individual course, no pre-requisites) with Inna Rozentsvit, MD, PhD) (NEW). Location: 1225 Park Avenue; 1225 Park Avenue, Suite 1E; NYC, 10128.

Main topics addressed: **Parent-child bonds as a template for interpersonal connections; ** How Winnicottian ideas about human capacities (for love, play, to be alone) and maternal preoccupation can be understood neurobiologically; ** Environmental influences, external and internal (hormonal and others), which shape these connections and shape parental behavior and behavior of children; ** Mind mapping and functional brain imaging related to parent-child connections and their vicissitudes; ** Neuro-psychopathology and health of parent-child bonds.

To register and for more information, please contact ORI administrator via email Admin@orinyc.org or by phone - 646-522-0387 or 646-522-1056.


2012 - 2013

Neurobiology for Psychoanalysts and Psychotherapists – through Neuropsychiatric Clinical Cases - with Inna Rozentsvit, M.D., PhD

6/12/12 – 6/26/12 (Tuesdays, 8pm-9:30pm);

Location – 41 E 11th Street; 4th Floor; NYC, 10003

“. . . (S)omething is eternal, and that something has to do with human beings. All the greatest people ever lived have been telling us that for five thousand years and yet you'd be surprised how people are always losing hold of it” (Thornton Wilder)

In this course, we will examine some clinical cases, their origins and development, their neural processes, brain-mind and neuro-social interactions.

We will look into important for any psychotherapist and psychoanalyst processes of neuroplasticity and neurointegration as the main processes, which drive one’s states of health and disease. We will look into connections of human brain’s anatomy (which is very specific to our species) with the wholesome and creative functioning of the mind (which differs from one individual to another).

This course will include previously scheduled workshop:  How the Brain Tricks the Mind: Alien hand syndrome, Tourette’s, Capgras, Cotard Syndromes, and many more.

No prerequisites for this course, just an open mind.

Fee: $200. Students and retired practitioners: $100/ full course.

For more information about this course, email inna.rozentsvit@gmail.com or call 646-522-1056.


2012

Neurobiology for Psychoanalysts and Psychotherapists: Introduction - with Inna Rozentsvit, M.D., PhD

4 weeks, on Tuesdays, 2/7/12 – 2/28/12; 8:00 - 9:30 pm

Location: 41 E 11th Street; 4th Floor; NYC, 10003

Fee: $200/ 4-week course ($100 for students and retired)

The intention [of this project] is to furnish a psychology that shall be a natural science. ~ S. Freud, 1895, Project for a Scientific Psychology

I am tormented by two aims: to examine what shape the theory of mental functioning takes if one introduces quantitative consideration, a sort of economics of nerve forces; and, second, to peel off from psychopathology a gain for normal psychology. ~ S. Freud, 1895, Letter to W. Fliess

He who has eyes to see and ears to hear becomes convinced that mortals can keep no secret. If their lips are silent, they gossip with their fingertips; betrayal forces itself through every pore. ~ S. Freud, 1905, The Case of Hysteria.

The brain is the organ of destiny. It holds within its humming mechanism secrets that will determine the future of the human race. ~ Wilder Penfield- The Second Career, 1963

Significance of understanding of neurobiology for those who dedicate their professional life to psychoanalysis was recognized by neurologist/ neuropathologist Sigmund Freud at the very birth of this profession. One can be fascinated how (without PET scans and fMRIs) he could picture the structure of the mind, while having not very sophisticated fish brains at hand.

The theory of mind and brain mapping started by Freud evolved into different merging areas of interest, such as social neurology, evolutionary neuroscience, interpersonal neuroscience, mindfulness, neuropsychoanalysis, etc., etc.

In this course, we will become acquainted with brain-mind connections, with neural processes involved in memory, emotions, and social interactions. We will look into neural and neurophysiological processes of attachment, trauma, plasticity, and integration (“What fires together – wires together!”).

We will look into connections of human brain’s anatomy (which is very specific to our species) with the wholesome and creative functioning of the mind (which differs from one individual to another).

To register, please email admin@orinyc.org and/ or call 646-522-1056. RSVP is required!

For registration form - click HERE


Link to NEURO-PSYCHO-EDUCATION page HERE

Link to Parent-Child Development Program page HERE

For Neurobiology and Psychoanalysis: Thoughts, Ideas, and Controversies page, please follow the link HERE.

READING RECOMMENDATIONS

           


 

 http://www.ctd.northwestern.edu/   Visit ORI's YouTube Channel, ObjectRelations2009, to view the highlights of our Annual Conferences:

       Thumbnail  2013 Conference - on Countertransference, Regret, Aggression, and Their Vicissitudes

         Self-Sabotage - from Jungian, Kleinian, and Fairbairnian Perspectives  2012 Conference on Self-Sabotage: Jungian, Kleinian,  and Fairbairnian Perspectives.  

  2011 Annual 20th Anniversary Conference on Dialectics of Mortality and Immortality: Time as a Persecutory vs. a Holding Object

2010 Annual Conference on Psychoanalysis & Spirituality

2009 Annual Conference on Eroticized Demonic Object

Visit ORI's YouTube Channel, ObjectRelations2009, to view NEW mini-video series "The Object Relations View"

Intro to the Object Relations Thinking and Clinical Technique - with Dr. Kavaler-Adler (part 1).

Projective Identification (part 2)

Time as an Object (part 3)

Self Sabotage - (part 4)

        Fear of Success (part 5)

        Mourning, Developmental vs. Pathological  (part 6)

        Bad Objects and Loyalty to Bad Objects (part 7)

        Demon-lover Complex  (part 8)

        Psychic Regret (part 9)

        Klein-Winnicott Dialectic  (part 10)

        Depression: The Object Relations View (part 11)

        Anxiety: The Object Relations View (part 12)

        Eating Disorders: The Object Relations View (part 13)

        Narcissism: The Object Relations View (part 14)

        Female Creativity and the Internal Father (part 15)

        Psychic Dialectic: The Object Relations View (part 16)

        Writing Blocks: The Object Relations View (part 17)

        Internal Editor and Internal Saboteur: The Object Relations View (part 18)

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