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DR. JEFFREY SEINFELD MEMORIAL   PSYCHOANALYTIC LICENSE  MENTAL HEALTH AWARENESS  NEURO-PSYCHO-EDUCATION

                          

D.W. WINNICOTT AND PRIMARY CREATIVITY IN CLINICAL PRACTICE

3rd Trimester of Year 1 of the One-Year, Two-Year and the Full Training in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis (can be also taken as an individual post-graduate certificate course; no pre-requisites)

12.5 CEs for NYS Licensed Social Workers & Licenses Mental Health Counselors -- approved by AMEDCO (see info below)

12.5 PD and post-graduate psychoanalytic education credits (for educators, legal professionals, psychoanalytic candidates in training) -- approved by the CE Committee of the Object Relations Institute for Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis.

Course instructor: Stefanie Teitelbaum, LCSW, NCPsyA

Dates: March, 26 2020 - June 4, 2020, Thursdays, 7:50 - 9:05pm. No class on April 9, 2020.

Tuition: $450/ 10-week course/ trimester (can be paid in 2 installments, upon request). Registration: $25/course (waived for candidates in training) - can be paid by CC via PayPal - follow the link: PayPal.Me/ORINYC . Additional registration fee ($25) for non-candidates.

Location: via Virtual participation only, due to current recommendations of CDC and local government (re: COVID-19). Virtual participation is conducted via audio/video or audio mode only (with minimal technical requirements).

To Register for the course, follow the link HERE

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

“From birth … the human being is concerned with the problem of the relationship between what is objectively perceived and what is subjectively conceived of, and in the solution of this problem, there is no health for the human being who has not been started off well enough by the mother. The intermediate area to which I am referring is the area that is allowed to the infant between primary creativity and objective perception based on reality testing.” (D.W. Winnicott, Playing and Reality; Chapter on Transitional Objects and Transitional Phenomena)

D.W. Winnicott’s primary creativity addresses the lifelong work of a human subject’s effort to live authentic experience. Winnicott’s body of work addresses the infinite complexities of achieving, representing, symbolizing, expressing and infinitum authentic self moments. 

This course will begin with Winnicott’s early paper “Creativity and Its Origins” (included in Playing and Reality, 1971), on primary creativity, and be used as an overarching lens to study his other familiar concepts. The course will also explore the similarities and differences in creativity of creating formal works of art, and the creativity of living. 

SYLLABUS

Class 1: INTRODUCTION

LEARNING GOALS: 1) to (a) examine and (b) analyze the role of Winnicott’s ‘primary psychic creativity’ as a core building block of object relations theory.

READINGS: 1) Winnicott, D.W. (2015). Human nature. London, UK: Routledge. Chapter: The use of an object.  2) Abram, J. (1996). The language of Winnicott: A dictionary of Winnicott's use of words. Perthshire, UK: Clunie Press. Chapter: Primary Psychic Creativity (p.115).

Classes 2 & 3: PLAYING AND REALITY – THROUGH THE LENS OF PRIMARY PSYCHIC CREATIVITY

LEARNING GOALS: 2) to apply the concept of primary psychic  creativity to formulate interventions when encountering the mirror in the mother’s face in clinical practice; 3) to apply the concept of primary creativity to formulate interventions when encountering illusion, fantasy and dreaming in clinical practice; 4) to apply the concept of primary creativity to formulate interventions when encountering transitional experience, transitional space and transitional objects in clinical practice.

READINGS: Winnicott, D.W. (1971). Playing and reality. London, UK: Tavistock. [Republished Routledge, 1991]

Classes 4, 5, & 6: THE MATURATIONAL PROCESSES AND THE FACILITATING ENVIRONMENT: STUDIES IN THE THEORY OF EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT – THROUGH THE LENS OF PRIMARY PSYCHIC CREATIVITY

LEARNING GOALS: 5) to apply the concept of primary creativity to formulate interventions when encountering capacity for concern in clinical practice; 6) to apply the concept of primary creativity to formulate interventions when encountering  true and false self phenomena in clinical practice; 7) to apply the concept of primary creativity to formulate interventions when encountering capacity to be alone in the presence of another in clinical practice.

READINGS: Winnicott, D.W. (1965). The maturational processes and the facilitating environment. London, UK: Hogarth.

Classes 7 & 8: DELINQUENCY MADNESS AND PSYCHOSOMATICS – THROUGH THE LENS OF PRIMARY PSYCHIC CREATIVITY

LEARNING GOALS: 8) to apply the concept of primary creativity to formulate interventions when encountering delinquency in clinical practice; 9) to apply the concept of primary psychic creativity to formulate interventions when encountering madness in clinical practice; 10) to apply the concept of primary psychic creativity to formulate interventions when encountering psychosomatics in clinical practice.

READINGS: 1) Winnicott, D.W. (1985). Deprivation and delinquency. London, UK: Tavistock Publications Limited. Chapter: Delinquency as hope. 2) Winnicott, D.W. (1966). Psycho-somatic illness in its positive and negative aspects. International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 47, 510-516. 3) Winnicott, D.W. (1989). Psychoanalytic explorations. Boston, MA: Harvard University Press. Chapter 20: Psychosomatic disorder: (I): Psycho-somatic illness in its positive and negative aspects, 1964; (II): Additional note on psycho-somatic disorder, 1969. 4) Chapter 21: The psychology of madness: A contribution of psycho-analysis, 1965.

Classes 9 & 10 PRIMARY PSYCHIC CREATIVITY and CREATIVE ARTS & ARTISTS

LEARNING GOALS: 11) to apply the concept of primary creativity to formulate interventions when encountering analytic work with creative artists who do not live creatively; 12) to apply the concept of primary creativity to formulate interventions with patients with artistic strivings and conflicts; 13) to analyze the similarity and differences of primary psychic creativity and artistic creativity.

READINGS: 1) Milner, M. (1969). The hands of the living god. Int. Psycho-Anal. Lib., 76, 1-426. London: The Hogarth Press and the Institute of Psycho-Analysis. 2) Winnicott, D.W. & Khan, M.R., Review of The hands of the living god.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

A. Related to GENERAL THEORY: At the end of this course, its participants will be able to: 1) analyze the role of Winnicott’s ‘primary creativity’ as a core building block of object relations theory; 2) analyze the similarity and differences of primary creativity and artistic creativity.

B. Related to GENERAL PSYCHOANLAYTIC PSYCHOTHERAPY PRACTICE: At the end of this course, its participants will be able to: 3) apply the concept of primary creativity to formulate interventions when encountering the mirror and the mother’s face in clinical practice; 4) apply the concept of primary creativity to formulate interventions when encountering illusion, fantasy and dreaming in clinical practice; 5) apply the concept of primary creativity to formulate interventions when encountering excitement and the true self in clinical practice; 6) apply the concept of primary creativity to formulate interventions when encountering capacity for concern in clinical practice;  7) apply the concept of primary creativity to formulate interventions when encountering capacity to be alone in the presence of another in clinical practice;  8) apply the concept of primary creativity to formulate interventions when encountering false self in clinical practice;  9) apply the concept of primary creativity to formulate interventions when encountering transitional experience, transitional space and transitional objects in clinical practice; 10) apply the concept of primary creativity to formulate interventions when encountering delinquency in clinical practice; 11) apply the concept of primary creativity to formulate interventions when encountering psychopathology in clinical practice.

C. Related to PRIMARY CREATIVITY and PSYCHOANALYTIC TREATMENT of CREATIVE ARTISTS: At the end of this course, its participants will be able to: 12) apply the concept of primary creativity to formulate interventions when encountering analytic work with creative artists who do not live creatively;  13) apply the concept of primary creativity to formulate interventions with patients with artistic strivings and conflicts.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Abram, J. (1996). The language of Winnicott: A dictionary of Winnicott's use of words. Perthshire, UK: Clunie Press.

Milner, M. (1969). The hands of the living god. Int. Psycho-Anal. Lib., 76:1-426. London: The Hogarth Press and the Institute of Psycho-Analysis.

Milner, M. (1987). The suppressed madness of sane men: Forty four years of exploring psychoanalysis. London, UK: Routledge.

Rodman, F.R. (1987). The spontaneous gesture: Selected letters of D.W. Winnicott. Boston, MA: Harvard University Press.

Winnicott, D.W. (1965). The maturational processes and the facilitating environment. London, UK: Hogarth.

Winnicott, D.W. (1967). Home is where we start from.

Winnicott, D.W. (1971). Playing and reality. London, UK: Tavistock; reproduced Routledge, 1991.

Winnicott, D.W. (2015). Human nature. London, UK: Routledge.

Winnicott, D.W. (2008). The Piggle: An account of psychoanalytic treatment of a little girl. New York, NY and London, UK: Penguin Books/ Hogarth.

Winnicott, D.W. (1986). Holding and interpretation. International Psycho-Analytic Library, 115, 1-194. London: The Hogarth Press and the Institute of Psycho-Analysis.

Winnicott, D.W. (1989). Psychoanalytic explorations. Boston, MA: Harvard University Press.

Winnicott, D.W. (1985). Deprivation and delinquency. Tavistock Publications Limited

Bio of the course instructor: Stefanie Teitelbaum, LCSW, NPsyA, B. Music - is the Supervisor, Training Analyst, Faculty of NPAP and IEA; Dean of Students, IEA; Instructor/Faculty, Training Analyst, Training Supervisor, ORI. She is the former staff psychotherapist at the Lower East Side Service Center’s Drug-Free Outpatient Program. Stefanie Teitelbaum is in private psychoanalytic practice in New York City. Contact info: 212 255-3284; 917 279-3414; stef.teitelbaum@gmail.com.

For full Bio of the Instructor, please follow the link HERE.

To Register for the course, follow the link HERE

To Register for one of the Training Programs, follow the link HERE

For more information, please contact ORI Administrator via email (adminorinyc@gmail.com) or phone (646-522-1056).

CONTINUING EDUCATION:

Certificates for CEs for NYS Licensed Social Workers, Mental Health Councelors, and Marriage & Family Therapists (12.5.5.hrs) are approved by AMEDCO.

New York Board for Social Workers - Amedco SW CPE is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #0115. 12.5 hours.

New York Board for Mental Health Counselors - Amedco is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors. #MHC-0061. 12.5hours.

Certificates for post-graduate training in psychoanalysis and/or psychoanalytic psychotherapy (12.5.5 hrs) are approved by ORI CE Committee, and will be available, as per request.

Please request your CEs and PDUs at the time of registration. CE certification fee: $25 (paid in addition to the course tuition and registration fee).

Please note that you will be able to claim only actually attended hours, in person or virtually.

 

CANCELLATION POLICY:
Refund in full is offered for cancellations made before March 26th, 2020. No refunds for cancellations made on or after March 26th, 2020 (but credit can be applied for any of the workshops offered at ORI in 2020 or further on).

 

Payment for the course tuition ($450) can be paid via PayPal (Paypal.me/ORINYC) or Square (https://checkout.square.site/pay/0f099068f3f1469095fe1d8bf448a5cd)

Payment for the CE certificate ($25) can be paid via PayPal (Paypal.me/ORINYC) or Square (https://checkout.square.site/pay/3adc7f03fde940c0886e15196600d455). Same links can be used for the registration fee ($25) for non-candidates in training. All those who are current or past candidates in training @ORI do not pay any registration fee for the course.

 


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