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The IPTAR Program Committee
presents

A CENTURY OF PSYCHOANALYTIC MYSTERY:
TELEPATHY IN THE CLINICAL PROCESS

Saturday, June 1: 11:30am – 4:00pm EST
Sunday, June 2: 11:30am – 4:00pm EST

BY ZOOM
INTERNATIONAL PRESENTERS:
Brazil: João Carlos Braga
France: Renaud Evrard, Thomas Rabeyron
Hungary: Julia Gyimesi
Israel: Ofra Eshel
United States: Janine de Peyer, Fonya Helm, Richard Reichbart, Ruth Rosenbaum, Mary Tennes

US ATTENDEES: $100 INCLUDES 6 CE CREDITS
INTERNATIONAL ATTENDEES: $50 INCLUDES 6 CE CREDITS
IPTAR MEMBERS: $80 INCLUDES 6 CE CREDITS US CANDIDATES: $35 INCLUDES 6 CE CREDITS
INTERNATIONAL CANDIDATES: $25 INCLUDES 6 CE CREDITS
* ZOOM LINK WILL BE ANNOUNCED *

REGISTER

INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOHISTORICAL ASSOCIATION’S
47th ANNUAL CONFERENCE
MAY 31st – June 2nd, 2024
(FRIDAY-SUNDAY)
VIRTUALLY ON ZOOM

HOPES and FEARS for OUR POLARIZED WORLD:
PSYCHOHISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES

SUBTHEMES: PSYCHOHISTORICAL INSIGHTS ON

• WAR IN ISRAEL/PALESTINE AND UKRAINE
• DEATH ANXIETY AND TERROR MANAGEMENT THEORY
• ULTRANATIONALIST, FUNDAMENTALIST, AND OTHER AUTHORITARIAN MOVEMENTS
• 2024 US PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES AND CAMPAIGNS
• ROOTS OF ADULT PSYCHOPATHOLOGY IN CHILDHOOD TRAUMA
• PSYCHOANALYSIS, HUMANE PARENTING, AND INDIVIDUAL AND COLLECTIVE HEALING


MORE INFO

Call for Papers:
Women’s Voices in Psychohistory and Psychoanalysis:
Different, Distinct, Marginalized, or Forgotten

(Articles are to be 500-2,500 words including a brief abstract, keywords, & bio.)
Papers to be submitted by June 15th for the Fall 2024 issue

Psychoanalytic theory and practice were originated and advanced by men.  To say that psychoanalysis was male-centric would be an understatement.  From Freud’s original work to the Wednesday Psychological Society, women had only a faint voice in the early psychoanalytic movement.  However, as the 20th century progressed so did the presence of women in psychoanalysis.  Theorist/clinicians such as Anna Freud, Melanie Klein, Karen Horney, Hanna Segal, Helene Deutsch, Joyce McDougall, to name a few, had begun to make significant and enduring contributions, garnering their share of notoriety, respect, and recognition, challenging the male dominated establishment.  Women psychobiographers who come to mind are Marie Bonaparte, Elizabeth Ann Danto, Phyllis Greenacre, Linda Hopkins, Elizabeth W. Marvick, Michelle Moreau-Ricaud, Élisabeth Roudinesco, and Elisabeth Young-Bruehl.

On December 2, 2023, the Psychohistory Forum organized the first Lifetime Achievement Awards ceremony dedicated to women contributors to psychohistory and psychoanalysis, and the recipients of the awards were Nancy Chodorow, Eva Fogelman, Carol Gilligan, and Nancy McWilliams.

We hope that this special issue of the Clio’s Psyche will celebrate the lives and achievements of more women contributors to this unique transdisciplinary field of psychohistory, as well as it will highlight various issues that women encounter in their everyday life.  It is your opportunity now to provide the insights that Freud hoped would come from women themselves.  “If you want to know more about femininity, enquire from your own experience of life, or turn to poets, or wait until science gives you deeper and more coherent information.” (S. Freud, 1933, Femininity. SE XXII, 112-135.)

Some possible approaches, all of which must be psychological, include:

  • The psychobiography of historical female personages
  • Case studies of women in psychohistory, psychology, psychoanalysis, and the politics of these organizations
  • The challenges of women in psychoanalysis, psychohistory, and political psychology
  • Women psychoanalysts’ psychology and women’s development as distinct from men, and can this be women in general as varying from the male model that Freud focused on?
  • In a different voice: gender differences in evaluation of various life situations
  • Poetry related to women, women’s lives, women’s issues—motherhood, parenting, partnership, creativity
  • What do women bring to psychoanalysis and psychohistory that men don’t, or don’t bring as readily?
  • Some other female analysts to consider writing on are Rosemary Balsam, Eva Fogelman, Annie Reich, Edith Jacobson, Arlene Kramer Richards, Sabina Spielrein, Harriet Lerner, Helen Block Lewis, Muriel Gardiner, Helen Gediman, Janine Chasseguet-Smirgel, Therese Benedek, Freida Fromm-Reichmann, Judith Kestenberg, Juliet Mitchell, Selma Kramer??, Helen Kaplan, Mary Jane Sherfey, Eleanor Galenson, Melitta Sperling, Ruth Mack Brunswick, Edith Weigert, Elizabeth Zetzel, Judy Kantrowitz, Selma Fraiberg, Clara Thompson, Contemporary psychoanalysts: Galit Atlas, Beatrice Beebe, Jessica Benjamin, Adrienne Harris, Deborah Luepnitz, Clara Mucci, Karlin Lyons-Ruth, Donna Orange, Joyce Slochower, Sandra Beuchler
  • Review essays of important books and movies regarding women in psychoanalysis

500-2500 words, due June 15, 2024

(Early submissions welcomed)

Sincerely yours,

Inna

Inna Rozentsvit, MD, PhD, Associate Editor of Clio’s Psyche and Director/Convenor of the Psychohistory Forum; Founder of NeuroRecovery Solutions, Inc.; Founder & Editor-in-Chief & ORI Academic Press, MindConsiliums, and MindMend Publishing; Programs Director @ the Object Relations Institute, NYC.  E-mail: 

Paul

Paul H. Elovitz, PhD, Historian, Research Psychoanalyst, Online Psychohistory Professor, Psychohistory Forum Director, and Editor, Clio’s Psyche; Author, The Making of Psychohistory: Origins, Controversies, and Pioneering Contributors (Routledge, 2018); Editor, The Many Roads of the Builders of Psychohistory (ORI Academic Press, 2021); Author/Editor of other books and about 400 other publications. See CliosPsyche.org for additional information.

MORE INFO

Call for Papers:
Psychohistorical/Psychoanalytic Explorations of the Threats to U.S. and World Democracies

(Articles are to be 500-2,500 words including a brief abstract, keywords, & bio.)
Papers to be submitted by June 15th for the Fall 2024 issue

Dear Colleagues,

Democracy is threatened and recently weakened in both the U.S. and around the world. In America, the Republican Party has become the party of the Trumpian election deniers with its candidate speaking of becoming a dictator for a day. Unless we go back to ancient Republican Rome, I can’t think of any successful time limits on dictators! In fact, it was the dictators, specifically the generals, who finally destroyed the Roman Republic. The attacks on democracies take many forms, especially when they are weak or in name only.

In his early days of ruling the Russian Federation, Vladimir Putin had portrayed himself to the German parliament as a good European democrat before proceeding to step by step destroy the fledgling Russian democracy. The Hungarian Victor Orband has effectively turned his country into an authoritarian state. Narendra Modi, the Hindu nationalist Prime Minister, is busily eroding Indian civil liberties, weakening its democracy. Recep Tayyip Erdogan has weakened Turkish democracy so much that the family of a student I (Paul Elovitz/PHE) mentor won’t dare return to their homeland because the father will immediately be put in jail for simply supporting a former ally of the Prime Minister turned dictator. I could continue with numerous examples ad nauseam.

We humans have gained such power over the earth that fantasy becoming reality is part of our modern world. With our incredibly diverse ways of communication with no one or two authoritative news outlets being generally accepted in America, Trumpian lies and those of the other dictators he so admires have seriously weakened our democratic processes. For this special issue on the psychology and political psychology of threats to democracy, I would like you to consider writing about threats around the entire planet as well as in the U.S. For the International Psychohistorical Association (IPhA), I’ve (PHE) organized a panel examining dangers to democracy that not many years ago were viewed by a lot of us as the inevitable future. I’ve asked the five presenters to write about the threats to French, Polish, Russian, and

U.S. democracy. My (PHE) personal focus will be on the appeals of MAGA and threats to the sense of national and personal identity as a result of the repitive of changes in our society. The dangers of an open border is what crystalizes these threats to Trump and other Right-wing leaning politicians in Europe and elsewhere.

We would like to invite you and other colleagues to probe the political psychology, psychohistory, and psychobiography of our subject for the Fall 2024 issue of Clio’s Psyche: Understanding the “Why” of Culture, Current Events, History, and Society.

We welcome different types of submissions, especially case studies, with psychoanalytic/ psychohistorical/psychological insights on a variety of aspects of the election such as:

  • Psychobiographical explorations of DeSantis, Trump, and those like them
  • The remaking of the responsible Republican Party as the nihilistic party of Trump
  • Psychobiographical/psychopolitical explorations of dictators & would-be dictators
  • The joys of supporting MAGA and its equivalents elsewhere
  • Why my (PHE) frustrated postal clerk said he would jump off the George Washington Bridge if Trump was not elected in 2016
  • Comparisons of Trump and other would-be dictators with Franco Hitler, & Musolini
  • A comparison of the threats to democracy in the S. with 1920s Weimar Germany
  • How the worldwide environmental crisis is creating mass movements of people and dangers that make democratic countries more vulnerable to fearmongering
  • How the democratization of communication has strengthened alarmist fears
  • Why S. voters have favored less qualified newcomers over the experienced
  • What happened to the traditional values of millions of Christian voters who are far more concerned with the policy result than with the immoral Trump as the messenger?
  • Examples of the projection of success and strength being more important than its reality
  • Why S. Republican voters care so little or not at all about foreign policy?
  • The flaws in S. democracy and how specifically they can be healed politically
  • Psychobiographical insights from the autobiographies, books, and speeches of dictators and would-be dictators
  • Psychohistorical reviews of major works on threats to democracy

We are seeking articles from 500-2,500 words—including an abstract (up to 50 words), seven to ten keywords (hyphenation is okay), and your brief biography ending in your email address—by June 15, 2024, for the Fall issue that we hope to mail in August. (Note that the IPhA presenters have been previously given a 3,000 word limit and a May 15, 2024, deadline.) Some longer (up to 3,000 words, which will be held to a higher standard) are welcome. A special (up to 3,500 words) article received by April 30th will be refereed early and may become the basis of a symposium. An expression of interest now, and then an abstract or outline by April 30th, would be helpful. Papers should be e-mailed as attached Microsoft Word (docx or doc) documents or rich text (rtf) files. Submissions the editors deem suitable are anonymously refereed. Once you’ve sent in your submission, please refrain from making any further changes.

We are open to all psychological/psychoanalytic and psychoanalytically informed political psychological approaches and prefer that articles be personalized (consider your own transference and countertransference feelings in writing), without psychoanalytic/psychological terminology or jargon, and with our modified APA style but without foot/endnotes. Indeed, we discourage citations except where there are quotations or they are otherwise essential. Our website (cliospsyche.org) provides guidelines (cliospsyche.org/guidelines) for authors.

One of our veteran editors and referees has made the excellent point that authors need to be self-editing their submissions, bearing in mind that Clio is a journal based on psychology that is moderate in tone and words. Please be moderate in your language while avoiding technical terminology. However, should an author with strong countertransference feelings approach their subject with clear-cut therapeutic insight as an Eriksonian participant observer, then their submission will receive careful consideration. You can get a better sense of our approaches by visiting our website at www.cliospsyche.org where you can find issues from 1994 to within two years of the present.

For those who are not familiar with our publication and its sponsor, Clio’s Psyche is entering its 30th year of publication by the Psychohistory Forum, a 42-year-old organization of academics, therapists, and laypeople holding regular scholarly meetings in Manhattan and at international conventions. We seek to publish thought-provoking, clearly written articles usually based upon psychoanalytic/psychological insight, developed with examples from history, current events, and the human experience.

We hope you can join this important endeavor. Many of our members and subscribers tell us that they find our publication to be a lively, compelling read that provides in-depth analyses. Please forward this Call for Papers to any colleagues (including associations or electronic mailing lists) who may be interested. If you have any questions, please e-mail me at .

Sincerely yours, Paul and Inna

Paul H. Elovitz, PhD, Historian, Research Psychoanalyst, Online Psychohistory

Professor, Psychohistory Forum Director, and Editor, Clio’s Psyche; Author, The Making of Psychohistory: Origins, Controversies, and Pioneering Contributors (Routledge,

2018); Editor, The Many Roads of the Builders of Psychohistory (ORI Academic Press, 2021); Author/Editor of other books and about 400 other publications. See CliosPsyche.org for additional information.

Inna Rozentsvit, MD, PhD, Associate Editor of Clio’s Psyche and Director/Convenor of the Psychohistory Forum; Founder of NeuroRecovery Solutions, Inc.; Founder & Editor-in-Chief & ORI Academic Press, MindConsiliums, and MindMend Publishing; Programs Director @ the Object Relations Institute, NYC. E-mail:

MORE INFO

Call for Papers:
Psychobiographies and the Autobiographies of Psychobiographers

(Articles are to be up to 3,000 words including your biography ending in your email address)
Chapters to be submitted by September 1, 2024

As a companion volume to The Many Roads of the Builders of Psychohistory (2021), I am collecting chapters for Psychobiographies and the Autobiographies of Psychobiographers. On a space-available basis, some of these psychobiographies and autobiographies will be published, perhaps in shorter form, in Clio’s Psyche. My hope is that members of the Psychohistory Forum’s Research and Publication Group will make sufficient submissions so that in 2024 we can have a special fourth issue of Clio’s Psyche on psychobiography.

In addition, it is my expectation that at least a few members of the Psychobiography Reading Group and participants in my virtual courses, An In-Depth Understanding of Famous and Ordinary People Through the Art of Psychobiography (Object Relations Institute) and Creativity, Psychohistory, and Psychobiography (New Jersey Institute for Training in Psychoanalysis), will submit articles/chapters. It will also be quite good if admirers of William McKinley “Mac” Runyan, who participated in his Festschrift or are part of the Bay State Psychobiography Group, contribute to the special psychobiography issue and the book.

I hope you will consider joining in this endeavor and share this Call for Chapters/Clio Articles with your friends and colleagues.

Best regards, Paul

Paul H. Elovitz, PhD, Historian, Research Psychoanalyst, Online Psychohistory Professor, Psychohistory Forum Director, and Editor, Clio’s Psyche; Author, The Making of Psychohistory:  Origins,  Controversies,  and Pioneering  Contributors (Routledge, 2018); Editor, The Many Roads of the Builders of Psychohistory (ORI Academic Press, 2021); Author/Editor of other books and about 400 other publications. His primary specialty within the field is presidential psychobiography. See CliosPsyche.org, PsychohistoryForum.com, and PsychobiographyForum.com for additional information.

MORE INFO

Call for Papers:
The Psychoanalysis and Psychohistory of Antisemitism

Special Issue, Spring 2024
Submissions due January 1, 2024

Dear Colleague,

We welcome your submissions, especially personalized ones with psychoanalytic, psychological, and psychohistorical insights on the hatred of Jews in the contemporary and historical worlds, including on the following subjects:

  • Definitions of antisemitism
  • Is antisemitism a useful term, although Jew-hatred is more accurate?
  • Envy and resentment of Jews, sometimes leading to paranoia
  • Historical Jew-hating in polytheistic Egypt, Persia, and Rome
  • Emerging rampant antisemitism during the Crusades
  • Christian and Islamic antisemitism throughout history
  • How durable will the Right-wing Christian support for Israel in the light of Christian Jew-hated be?
  • Castration anxiety related to the Jewish covenant involving circumcision of the foreskin
  • Sibling rivalry of Christians and Muslims who see Judaism as the oldest Abrahamic religion
  • Disagreement with Israeli governmental policies as a cloak for antisemitism?
  • Why is the hatred of Jews such an enduring feature of Western and Islamic history?
  • A double standard for Jews: Is the “Jew as victim” challenged by Israeli toughness?
  • Are Jews disdained for being fighters rather than victims?
  • Anti-Israeli government policies conflated with antisemitism despite Jewish opposition to them
  • Jewish self-hared: Antisemitism among Jews—Marx and many others
  • What are the parallels between Jews in the U.S. and in pre-expulsion Spain and Germany?
  • Pioneers of capitalism and modernity: Are Jews hated as the yeast of modern civilization?
  • What is the relationship of Judaism and psychoanalysis?
  • Why did Stalin, a mostly secret antisemite, call Jew-hatred a form of cannibalism?
  • How does Left-wing and communist antisemitism differ from Right-wing Jew hatred?
  • The literature of antisemitism and philosemitism

We seek articles from 1,500-2,500 words—including your title, author name with affiliation, a 25-word abstract, 7-10 keywords, and your brief biography (3-4 sentences) ending in your email address.  Send documents in Microsoft Word (*docx or doc) format by January 15, 2024.  We urge you to share this Call for Papers with colleagues and lists.

Clio’s Psyche and the Psychohistory Forum:

It is the style of our scholarly quarterly to publish thought-provoking, clearly written articles usually based upon psychoanalytic/psychological insight and developed with examples from history, current events, and the human experience.  We are open to all psychological and psychohistorical approaches and prefer that articles be personalized, without psychoanalytic/psychological terminology or jargon.  At the moment, we are converting to a modified version of the latest APA citation system, which will have very few references and those overwhelmingly for direct quotes.  We emphasize good literary style without referring to authorities except when essential.  Indeed, we discourage citations except where there are quotations, or they are otherwise essential.  Submissions the editors deem suitable are anonymously refereed in our double-blind system.  Once you have submitted your article, please do not make any further edits to the piece until we return it to you if necessary.

For those who are not familiar with our publication and its sponsor, Clio’s Psyche is in its 30th year of publication by the Psychohistory Forum, a 41-year-old organization of academics, therapists, and laypeople holding regular scholarly meetings in Manhattan, at international conventions, and virtually.  For information on our publication and back issues over a year old, go to our website at cliospsyche.org/archives.  For more information on our style guidelines, go to cliospsyche.org/guidelines.  Write me for information on how to join our group and read our print journal.

Sincerely yours,

Paul

Paul H. Elovitz, PhD, Historian, Research Psychoanalyst, Online Professor, Editor-in-Chief, Clio’s Psyche, Founder and Director of the Psychohistory Forum, and author The Making of Psychohistory: Origins, Controversies, and Pioneering Contributors (Routledge, 2018)
E-mail: 

Inna
Inna Rozentsvit, M.D., PhD, MBA, MSciEd, Associate Editor of Clio’s Psyche, and Associate Director of the Psychohistory Forum, Neurologist, Neurodiversity & Neurorehabilitation Specialist, Psychoanalyst, Psychohistorian, Transdisciplinary Researcher, Certified Mediator and Certified Parent Coach. Founder of & Neuropsychoeducator @ NeuroRecovery Solutions, Inc. (www.neurorecoverysolutions.com); Director of Programs, Scientific Faculty Member, & Founder of the Parent-Child Development and the Neuropsychoanalysis Programs @ the Object Relations Institute for Psychotherapy & Psychoanalysis (www.orinyc.org); Founder of & Editor-in-Chief @ ORI Academic Press, MindMend Publishing (www.oriacademicpress.org), and the MindConsiliums (open access journal, www.mindconsiliums.org). More information is on www.innarozentsvit.com.

MORE INFO

IPhA’s Faith, Psychology and Social Justice Working Group

RELIGION, FREUD, AND WOMEN
SATURDAY, September 9th, 2023, 1:00 – 3:00 PM EDT
with Jefrey B. Rubin (presenter),
and Theresa Aiello, Gabriella Gusita, Trevor C. Pederson, Charlotte Schwartz (respondents)

Religion enjoys a problematic standing in psychoanalysis. Since its inception, psychoanalysis has traditionally pathologized and marginalized religion. The standard story is that Freud, the exemplar of Enlightenment rationalism, critiqued the childish illusions underlying religious belief and revealed its seamy underside. While religion has had a Janus-faced history — fostering morality and fueling oppression; promoting civic concern and legitimating fundamentalism — it is more complex than Freud’s account of its origins in childhood fears and compensations would suggest.

“Religion, Freud, and Women” by Jeffrey Rubin (the download link is above) examines a hidden source of Freud’s rejection of religion, namely, his problematic relationship with his mother. In this essay, Jeffrey Rubin draws on revisionist psychobiographical material about Freud’s relationship with his mother to demonstrate that he unconsciously linked religion and the maternal. His fears of the latter led to his rejection of the former. If it is unanalytic to fail to explore the hidden meanings and functions of religious experience, it is anti-analytic to take anything on faith including atheism. In rejecting religion and disavowing spirit, perhaps psychoanalysis has rejected a good deal more than superstition.

A psychoanalysis that worked through its countertransference about religion would open the door to a contemplative psychoanalysis, which would open a potential space for a more meaningful spirituality.

For more information and to RSVP, visit
https://mindmendmedia.com/religion-freud-and-women/

RELIGION AND DEATH A CENTURY LATER:
STANDING ON THE SHOULDERS OF FREUD AND JUNG
SATURDAY, JULY 29th, 2023, 1:00 – 3:00 PM EDT, ON ZOOM

About a hundred years ago, Carl Jung and Sigmund Freud penned influential writings on the nature of religion and how the religious imagination construes death.

Jung’s Psychology of the Unconscious (1912) and Freud’s The Future of an Illusion (1927) staked out contrasting views on the nature of religion. Jung saw the world’s mythologies and religions, like the dreams of individuals, as a repository of symbols innate to the human psyche and pointing towards wholeness and healing. Freud, also viewing religion and dreams as related expressions of the unconscious, construed both as wishful thinking that provides a compensation in fantasy for actual deprivation, especially sexual deprivation, and the wish for an all-powerful and nurturant parent.

In Jung’s framework, death is a symbolic construct representing psychic transformation, while in Freud’s, it is a literal reality denied by the false promise of an afterlife. What relevance do these ideas continue to have a century later and what else can we say at this time about the nature of religion and the problem of death?

There are innumerable ways of answering these big questions. In their short article “Religion and Death a Century Later” (published in the Journal of Psychohistory in 2023), Brian D’Agostino and Dorothea Leicher present a view informed by empirical findings from neuroscience, psychohistory research, and experimental psychology, with topics that include Terror Management Theory; the psychology of fundamentalism; Jungian archetypes as emergent outcomes of nature-nurture interaction; and the continued relevance of archetypes for understanding the psychology, history, and sociology of religion. Authors subsume these disparate topics into a unified and evidence-based perspective on religion and death, and then conclude with clinical and social implications.

For more information, please visit:
https://mindmendmedia.com/religion-and-death-a-century-later-standing-on-the-shoulders-of-freud-and-jung/

Psychobiography Reading Group
of the Psychohistory Forum

6th Meeting
January 13th, 2024 (11:00am – 1pm EDT; room opens at 10:30 am)

For our 6th meeting, we will be READING:

Chapter 2: Sigmund Freud,
in Faces in a Cloud: Intersubjectivity and Personality Theory, by G. Atwood and R. Stolorow

Chapter 15: Freud as Leonardo: Why the First Psychobiography Went Wrong, by A. C. Elms, A.,
in W. T. Schultz, Handbook of Psychobiography

The Psychobiography Research and Publication Group of the Psychohistory Forum, with the strong support of Inna Rozentsvit and Ken Fuchsman, has created the virtual Psychobiography Reading Group. Our expectation is that we will meet once in two months and that we should work hard to keep this as a serious psychoanalytic approach to psychobiography. Subsequently, our focus will be on classic works of psychodynamic psychobiography, with the bottom-up approach rather coming from explicit underlying theories.

Please note that we usually choose short readings to ensure that they will be read ahead of time.
Individuals who have not done the readings for this group will need to stay muted to establish this as a true discussion group. 

For more information and to RSVP – visit
https://psychohistoryforum.com/psychobiography-reading-group-of-the-psychohistory-forum-6th-meeting/

Psychobiography Reading Group
of the Psychohistory Forum

7th Meeting
March 30th, 2024 (11:00am – 1pm EDT; room opens at 10:30 am)

For our 7th meeting, we will be READING:

  1. D. W. Winnicott & Masud Khan (2008). POEMS AND OTHER WORKS. Psychoanalytic Perspectives, 5(2), 91-97.
    https://www.dropbox.com/scl/fi/av96zl7h76swmmgqef0rp/Winnicott-and-Khan-Poems-and-Other-Works.pdf?rlkey=kpec186uwuy7xwkuh51ur6y9d&dl=0
  2. B. Kahr (2011). The Biographical Roots of Winnicott’s HATE in COUNTER-TRANSFERENCE. American Imago, 68(2), 173-211. https://www.dropbox.com/scl/fi/er9ryzw4djr0j26wqouit/Kahr-B.-The-Biographical-Roots-of-Winnicott-s-HATE-in-COUNTERTRANSFERENCE.pdf?rlkey=z0grchzq5yf7cxp2w7j9j2yqz&dl=0
  3. D.W. Winnicott (1949). Hate in the Counter-Transference. International Journal of Psycho-Analysis,30, 69-74. https://www.dropbox.com/scl/fi/t3opiuwqrsj4fg0dz0o7g/Winnicott-D.W.-1949-.-Hate-in-the-Counter-Transference.docx?rlkey=8w4z1zpcefn2rnpq6o3xbymkm&dl=0
  4. R. Ehrlich (2021). Winnicott’s Idea of the False Self: Theory as Autobiography. Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association 69(1), 75-108. https://www.dropbox.com/scl/fi/mz4jpnshbtv2hqoqwm8rs/Ehrlich-2021-Winnicott-s-idea-of-the-false-self-theory-as-autobiography.pdf?rlkey=xawlemrv21rxuiydql315ih90&dl=0

Although none of these readings represents a psychobiography in a traditional sense, all of the materials are indeed autopsychobiographical (e.g., young Winnicott’s letter to his mother and his poem, The Tree, dedicated to his mother and the mother-child relationship) and psychobiographical (Kahr’s investigation of the biographical roots of Winnicott’s work on hate, as well as Ehrlich’s investigation of Winnicott’s theories as the auto-psycho-biographies).

The Psychobiography Research and Publication Group of the Psychohistory Forum, with the strong support of Inna Rozentsvit and Ken Fuchsman, has created the virtual Psychobiography Reading Group. Our expectation is that we will meet once in two months and that we should work hard to keep this as a serious psychoanalytic approach to psychobiography. Subsequently, our focus will be on classic works of psychodynamic psychobiography, with the bottom-up approach rather coming from explicit underlying theories.

Please note that we usually choose short readings to ensure that they will be read ahead of time. Individuals who have not done the readings for this group will need to stay muted to establish this as a true discussion group. Participation is free, but your RSVP is required – see the form below.

You will get the response to your RSVP that includes the Zoom information. Zoom link reminder will also be sent out the day before the meeting.

For more information and to RSVP – visit
https://psychohistoryforum.com/psychobiography-reading-group-of-the-psychohistory-forum-7th-meeting/

BORN OF LOVE: TWO BOOKS CELEBRATING THE WORK OF MICHAEL EIGEN

VIRTUAL INTERACTIVE SEMINAR
with Drs. MICHAEL EIGEN, LORAY DAWS, and ROBIN BAGAI
NOVEMBER 18, 2023 (Saturday), 12-3pm EDT/EST
Attendance is FREE, but RSVP is required

This conference is a celebration of Michael Eigen’s contributions to psychology and psychoanalysis over many decades. It will feature Dr. Eigen talking about his work in addition to introducing Drs. Loray Daws and Robin Bagai who will speak about their respective books honoring his work: Loray Daws’s Introduction to the Work of Michael Eigen (Routledge, 2023) and Robin Bagai’s Commentaries on the Work of Michael Eigen: Oblivion and Wisdom, Madness and Music (Routledge, 2023).

For more information and to RSVP, visit
https://mindmendmedia.com/born-of-love-two-books-celebrating-the-work-of-michael-eigen/

Call for Papers – Psychological Explorations of Election 2024:
Psychobiography, Emotions, Age, Political Illusions, and Electoral Realities

(due February 15, 2024)

At the moment (May 2023), the 2024 presidential nominating contests look like a repeat of 2020 with significant elements making both the Democratic and Republican parties unenthusiastic about their likely candidate.  Biden’s age and low public opinion ratings and Trump’s age, denial he lost in 2020, support for the January 6, 2022 insurrection, and legal troubles are major issues behind these feelings.  While DeSantis, Haley, Scott, and others jockey for support, it is unclear if any can get nominated in the face of Trump’s animosity and the loyalty of his supporters.  We would like to invite you and other colleagues to probe the political psychology, psychohistory, and psychobiography of the subject for the Winter 2024 issue of Clio’s Psyche: Understanding the “Why” of Culture, Current Events, History, and Society.

We welcome different types of submissions, especially case studies, with psychoanalytic/ psychohistorical/psychological insights on a variety of aspects of the election such as:

  • Psychobiographical explorations of Biden, DeSantis, Haley, Scott, et al., and Trump
  • Intense feelings of hatred toward Biden, Trump, et al.
  • Detailed psychobiographical and psychopolitical comparisons of Biden and Trump
  • Comparing Biden and Trump’s accomplishments, goals, and leadership
  • Case studies of how voters are torn between idealization and denigration
  • Ideological purity versus the desire to win: Identification with the winner
  • The process of identification with a candidate and switching to a surviving candidate
  • The relationship between the leader and the led in the 2024 election
  • At what point do disappointments, dreams, and illusions give way to political realities
  • Spouses and children of the candidates
  • Perils of verbal (and non-verbal) slips along the campaign trail and in debates
  • Cycles in American politics and their influence on the 2024 election
  • Comparing the foreign policy of Biden and Trump
  • American electoral fantasies and the world’s realities
  • The mood of the voters: from the very energized to the stay-at-home non-voters
  • The psychology of independent voters and the possibility of a strong third party candidate
  • Psychobiographical insights from candidates’ autobiographies, books, and speeches

We seek articles from 1,500-2,500 words—including your title, author name with affiliation, a 25-word abstract, 7-10 keywords, and your brief biography (3-4 sentences) ending in your email address.  Send documents in Microsoft Word (*docx or doc) format by February 15, 2024. We would welcome a symposium article of up to 3,500 words on the subject, but it must be submitted by January 1 to be peer reviewed and to have colleagues write commentaries (of up to 1,200 words) of it.  We urge you to share this Call for Papers with colleagues and lists.


For more information, please check the full Call for Papers at the following webpage:

https://psychohistoryforum.com/psychological-explorations-of-election-2024-psychobiography-emotions-age-political-illusions-and-electoral-realities/

Psychobiography Reading Group
of the Psychohistory Forum
5th Meeting: October 14th, 2023 (11:00am – 1pm EDT; room opens at 10:30 am)
Reading S. Freud’s Leonardo daVinci and a Memory of His Childhood

At our 5th meeting, we will discuss Freud’s (1916) Leonardo da Vinci: A Psychosexual Study of an Infantile Reminiscence (translated by A.A. Brill), also known as Leonardo da Vinci: A Memory of His Childhood (translated by A. Tyson).

This essay by S. Freud is a reconstruction of Leonardo’s emotional life from his earliest years, it represents Freud’s first sustained venture into biography from a psychoanalytic perspective, and also his effort to trace one route that homosexual development can take. (From the publisher’s book description)

For more information and to RSVP – visit https://psychohistoryforum.com/psychobiography-reading-group-of-the-psychohistory-forum-5th-meeting/

Psychoanalytical and Psychobiographical Explorations
of Shakespeare as Revealed in His Plays
with Dr. Jeffrey Rubin
September 30, 2023, 10:30am – 1pm EDT

Shakespeare captivates — and eludes — us. We are fascinated by his work and at pains to understand who he was. Given the absence of diaries, personal correspondence, or manifestos about his artistic process or opus, it is unsurprising that a dominant strain in recent criticism is skepticism about our ability to understand his personality or forge links between him and his work.

Jung, like Nietzsche, knew that one’s creative work is a “subjective confession.” Even though there is a dearth of overt biographical information about Shakespeare, there is something that the vast number of critics ignore — or neglect the implications of — the haunting personal testament encoded in the plays.

Dr. Rubin will draw on evocative moments in Coriolanus and Richard IIIHamlet and King LearTitus Andronicus and Julius CaesarMeasure for Measure and The Tempest based on psychoanalytic insights about empathy and unconscious symbolization, communication, and motivation, and dreaming and our capacity for creativity and self-healing.

When we consider Shakespeare’s oeuvre as a whole and bring together disparate and seemingly unrelated elements that are normally kept apart — from absent and devouring mothers and evil usurpers to stolen and mistaken identities and inauthentic selves — a new and startling picture occurs of a vexed genius whose creations were both an incalculable gift and a breathtaking attempt to solve a personal and disturbing mystery: what happened to me?

The bard’s work is, in a quintessentially Jungian way, both an unparalleled elucidation of human life and a poignant story about his creative attempts to symbolize what afflicted him and unconsciously strive to heal himself. My hope is that after this wide-ranging sojourn over Shakespeare’s plays and a recontextualization of his life and work and a more intimate encounter with him, we will not only engage his work with renewed vitality but be personally transformed and enriched.

For more information, and to RSVP, visit
https://psychohistoryforum.com/psychoanalytical-and-psychobiographical-explorations-of-shakespeare-as-revealed-in-his-plays/

IPhA’s Faith, Psychology and Social Justice Working Group

RELIGION, FREUD, AND WOMEN
SATURDAY, September 9th, 2023, 1:00 – 3:00 PM EDT
with Jefrey B. Rubin (presenter),
and Theresa Aiello, Gabriella Gusita, Trevor C. Pederson, Charlotte Schwartz (respondents)

Religion enjoys a problematic standing in psychoanalysis. Since its inception, psychoanalysis has traditionally pathologized and marginalized religion. The standard story is that Freud, the exemplar of Enlightenment rationalism, critiqued the childish illusions underlying religious belief and revealed its seamy underside. While religion has had a Janus-faced history — fostering morality and fueling oppression; promoting civic concern and legitimating fundamentalism — it is more complex than Freud’s account of its origins in childhood fears and compensations would suggest.

“Religion, Freud, and Women” by Jeffrey Rubin (the download link is above) examines a hidden source of Freud’s rejection of religion, namely, his problematic relationship with his mother. In this essay, Jeffrey Rubin draws on revisionist psychobiographical material about Freud’s relationship with his mother to demonstrate that he unconsciously linked religion and the maternal. His fears of the latter led to his rejection of the former. If it is unanalytic to fail to explore the hidden meanings and functions of religious experience, it is anti-analytic to take anything on faith including atheism. In rejecting religion and disavowing spirit, perhaps psychoanalysis has rejected a good deal more than superstition.

A psychoanalysis that worked through its countertransference about religion would open the door to a contemplative psychoanalysis, which would open a potential space for a more meaningful spirituality.

For more information and to RSVP, visit
https://mindmendmedia.com/religion-freud-and-women/

RELIGION AND DEATH A CENTURY LATER:
STANDING ON THE SHOULDERS OF FREUD AND JUNG
SATURDAY, JULY 29th, 2023, 1:00 – 3:00 PM EDT, ON ZOOM

About a hundred years ago, Carl Jung and Sigmund Freud penned influential writings on the nature of religion and how the religious imagination construes death.

Jung’s Psychology of the Unconscious (1912) and Freud’s The Future of an Illusion (1927) staked out contrasting views on the nature of religion. Jung saw the world’s mythologies and religions, like the dreams of individuals, as a repository of symbols innate to the human psyche and pointing towards wholeness and healing. Freud, also viewing religion and dreams as related expressions of the unconscious, construed both as wishful thinking that provides a compensation in fantasy for actual deprivation, especially sexual deprivation, and the wish for an all-powerful and nurturant parent.

In Jung’s framework, death is a symbolic construct representing psychic transformation, while in Freud’s, it is a literal reality denied by the false promise of an afterlife. What relevance do these ideas continue to have a century later and what else can we say at this time about the nature of religion and the problem of death?

There are innumerable ways of answering these big questions. In their short article “Religion and Death a Century Later” (published in the Journal of Psychohistory in 2023), Brian D’Agostino and Dorothea Leicher present a view informed by empirical findings from neuroscience, psychohistory research, and experimental psychology, with topics that include Terror Management Theory; the psychology of fundamentalism; Jungian archetypes as emergent outcomes of nature-nurture interaction; and the continued relevance of archetypes for understanding the psychology, history, and sociology of religion. Authors subsume these disparate topics into a unified and evidence-based perspective on religion and death, and then conclude with clinical and social implications.

For more information, please visit:
https://mindmendmedia.com/religion-and-death-a-century-later-standing-on-the-shoulders-of-freud-and-jung/

Call for Papers: Psychobiography
(due October 1, 2023)

For this Winter 2024 Special Feature of Clio’s Psyche, we welcome your submissions with psychoanalytic, psychological, and psychohistorical insights, on PSYCHOBIOGRAPHY, including the following subjects:

  • The autobiographies of psychobiographers (eventually to be included in an edited book along with psychobiographies they have written).
  • Focus comparatively on the coping mechanisms of people in psychobiography.
  • Psychobiographical studies that illustrate transgenerational transmission of trauma and resilience.
  • Presenting a case study of an academic psychologist going beyond personal. characteristics and traits to emphasize the childhood and life passage of the whole person.
  • A psychobiographical study of a major academic psychologist relating theory to her/his life.
  • Presenting a case study of an academic psychoanalyst focusing much less on theory. after undergoing psychoanalytic training and delving into the childhood and inner life in a different manner.
  • Teaching psychobiography.
  • A comparative study of the approaches and methodologies of psychobiographers from a variety of fields.
  • A comparative psychobiography of ordinary people in crisis such as what is happening in Ukraine.
  • The role of gender: A comparative study of the psychobiographies written by women and men.
  • An in-depth study of psychobiographies of the 20thcentury including early Freudian ones.
  • Book reviews on psychobiographical monographs.
  • Reviews of psychobiographical books and major media biographies.

For more information about this Call for Papers, please follow the link here:
https://psychohistoryforum.com/call-for-papers-psychobiography/

Call for Papers – The Psychoanalysis and Psychohistory of Antisemitism
(due January 1, 2024)

We welcome your submissions, especially personalized ones with psychoanalytic, psychological, and psychohistorical insights on the hatred of Jews in the contemporary and historical worlds, including on the following subjects:

  • Definitions of anti-Semitism.
  • Is anti-Semitism a useful term, although Jew-hatred is more accurate?
  • Envy and resentment of Jews, sometimes leading to paranoia.
  • Historical Jew-hating in polytheistic Egypt, Persia, and Rome.
  • Emerging rampant anti-Semitism during the Crusades.
  • Christian and Islamic anti-Semitism throughout history.
  • Castration anxiety related to the Jewish covenant involving circumcision of the foreskin.
  • Sibling rivalry of Christians and Muslims who see Judaism as the Oldest Abrahamic religion.
  • Disagreement with Israeli governmental policies as a cloak for anti-Semitism?
  • Why is the hatred of Jews such an enduring feature of Western and Islamic history?
  • A double standard for Jews: Is the “Jew as victim” challenged by Israeli toughness?
  • Jewish self-hared: Anti-Semitism among Jews—Marx and many others.
  • What are the parallels between Jews in the U.S. and in pre-expulsion Spain and Germany?
  • Pioneers of capitalism and modernity: Are Jews hated as the yeast of modern civilization?
  • What is the relationship of Judaism and psychoanalysis?
  • Why did Stalin, a not-so-secret anti-Semite, call Jew-hatred a form of cannibalism?
  • How does Left-wing and communist anti-Semitism differ from Right-wing Jew hatred?
  • The literature of anti-Semitism.

We seek articles from 1,500-2,500 words—including your title, author name with affiliation, a 25-word abstract, 7-10 keywords, and your brief biography (3-4 sentences) ending in your email address. Send documents in Microsoft Word (*docx or doc) format by October 1, 2023. We urge you to share this Call for Papers with colleagues and lists. A high-quality article of up to 3500 words received by July 1, 2023 may be accepted as a symposium piece and distributed for commentaries.

For more information, please visit:
https://psychohistoryforum.com/call-for-papers-the-psychoanalysis-and-psychohistory-of-anti-semitism/

Call for Papers – The Relationship of Poetry and Psychoanalysis/Psychohistory
(due October 1, 2023)

We invite papers from poets, scholars, therapists, and our readers who enjoy thinking about or writing poetry to join in moving from unconscious to conscious expression, including on the following subjects:

  • What does the poetry you write or read mean to you?
  • Why not write a poem on how psychoanalysis impacted your life?
  • What is the therapeutic value of poetry?
  • Why is the poetry of death, dying, and loss so helpful in the grieving process?
  • Why did Freud recognize that the poets, as well as the philosophers before him, discovered the unconscious?
  • How do trauma and poetic expression intersect?
  • What is the relationship between poetry and politics and social activism?
  • What poem has meant the most to you and why?
  • Why not write a psychobiographical account of one of your favorite poets?
  • How does poetry help people to confront their deepest unconscious desires?
  • How do people connect through poetry?
  • How can applied psychohistorical poetry contribute to scholarship without being “academic”?
  • How does poetry make sense of repressed emotions, rendering the inchoate coherent?
  • Why not compare the poetry of fear, love, hatred, patriotism, and war?
  • Why is poetry so meaningful in the Russian tradition?
  • Why is poetry so relatively insignificant in the American tradition?

We seek articles from 1,500-2,500 words—including your title, author name with affiliation, a 25-word abstract, 7-10 keywords, and your brief biography (3-4 sentences) ending in your email address.  Send documents in Microsoft Word (*docx or doc) format by October 1, 2023. We would welcome a symposium article of up to 3,500 words on the subject, but it must be submitted by October 1 to be peer reviewed and to have colleagues write commentaries (of up to 1,200 words) of it.  We urge you to share this Call for Papers with colleagues and lists.


For more information, please check the full Call for Papers at the following webpage:

https://psychohistoryforum.com/call-for-papers-the-relationship-of-poetry-and-psychoanalysis-psychohistory/

Psychobiography Reading Group
of the Psychohistory Forum

4th Meeting: August 5th, 2023 (11:00am – 1pm EDT; room open at 10:30 am)

Reading Lawrence Friedman’s
Identity’s Architect: A Biography of Erik H. Erikson

 

This book presents a biography of Erik H. Erikson, postwar America’s most influential psychoanalyst, who reshaped our views of human development. Drawing on private materials and interviews with Erikson’s family, students, and colleagues around the world, the author illuminates the relationship between Erikson’s personal life and his groundbreaking ideas. This book lays bare the identity crisis that was at the root of Erikson’s lifelong quest to discover who his father was. Friedman shows how Erikson’s 8-stage model of the human life cycle grew from the birth of his 3rd son, who was born developmentally handicapped. Even his studies of M. Luther, M. Gandhi, T. Jefferson, and Jesus were inseparable from his life circumstances. The book also examines how Erikson’s influence as a teacher reverberates through the work of his students who have gone on to prominence. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)

For more information and to RSVP – visit
https://psychohistoryforum.com/psychobiography-reading-group-of-the-psychohistory-forum-4th-meeting/

Announcing the Psychobiography Reading Group
of the Psychohistory Forum on June 3, 2023

June 3rd, 2023 (11:00am – 1pm EDT; room open at 10:30 am), 3rd Meeting
For our 3rd meeting, we will be reading Chapters 2 and 3 of
Erik Erikson’s Young Man Luther: A Study in Psychoanalysis and History.

For more information and to RSVP – visit
https://psychohistoryforum.com/psychobiography-reading-group-reading-e-eriksons-young-man-luther-a-study-in-psychoanalysis-and-history/

INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOHISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
46th ANNUAL CONFERENCE
VIRTUAL LIVE
MAY 18-20, 2023
https://ipanewsletters.com/ipha-2023/

WHAT ON EARTH IS GOING ON?
PSYCHOHISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES ON A WORLD ON THE EDGE

PSYCHOHISTORICAL INSIGHTS ON

CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE PSYCHOLOGY OF DENIAL
WARS, GEOPOLITICAL CONFLICT, AND OTHER INTERNATIONAL CRISES
RESURGENT TRIBALISM: BACKLASH TO NEOLIBERAL GLOBALIZATION
GENDER, RACE, AND IDEOLOGIES OF DOMINATION

INTERGENERATIONAL TRANSMISSION OF TRAUMA AND RESILIENCE
PSYCHOANALYSIS and the TURMOIL OF OUR TIMES — CAN STRUCTURE HOLD, and SHOULD IT?

GROUP PSYCHOLOGY AND ANALYSIS OF THE EGO IN A TIME OF GLOBALIZATION
MUSIC, POETRY, AND HEALING
CHILDHOOD AND ITS HISTORY
PSYCHOBIOGRAPHY

With record breaking temperatures, wildfires, and extreme weather events, it is now clear that humanity faces a climate emergency and Sixth Extinction that threaten both human civilization and our planet’s biodiversity. Yet an entire political party in the United States and similar parties in other countries exhibit a psychology of denial about the urgency of the threat and its human causes. Other global aspects of our “Anthropocene epoch” encompass what some call a New Cold War, pandemics, and an acceleration of technological change including artificial intelligence.

All this is occurring in the context of an international political-economic system that puts profits before the needs of ordinary people, fueling a populist backlash to globalization. In its right-wing variants, this includes toxic racial and gender dynamics; authoritarian politics and religion; and other forms of tribalism.

Where do we begin in responding effectively to these myriad challenges? In this conference we tap the full range of psychoanalytic and psychohistorical resources as a basis for understanding and healing.

KEYNOTE SPEAKER:
STEVEN PINKER: THE BETTER ANGELS OF OUR NATURE

FEATURED SPEAKERS:
SALLY WEINTROBE: PSYCHOLOGICAL ROOTS OF THE CLIMATE CRISIS

JAMES W. ANDERSON: ANIMOSITY, AFFECTION, AGONY, AND EMPATHY: ELEMENTS IN PSYCHOBIOGRAPHERS’ RELATIONSHIPS WITH THE PEOPLE THEY STUDY 

The FULL PROGRAM and the REGISTRATION FORM
can be accessed via the following link:
https://ipanewsletters.com/ipha-2023/

Book Celebration Party

Selected Papers by Susan Kavaler-Adler,
Volume 1:
Developmental Mourning, Erotic Transference,
and Object Relations Psychoanalysis

Date/time: SUNDAY APRIL 30TH, 2023, 2 PM

RSVP is required for this free event – please use the following registration form


For more information, endorsements and to order – visit https://orinyc.org/invitation-to-dr-susan-kavaler-adlers-book-party/

Book Celebration Virtual Party

Selected Papers by Susan Kavaler-Adler,
Volume 1:
Developmental Mourning, Erotic Transference,
and Object Relations Psychoanalysis

Date/time: March 11, 2023, 1pm – 4pm EST

RSVP is required for this free event – please use the following registration form


For more information, endorsements and to pre-order – visit https://orinyc.org/book-celebration-virtual-party/

Self-Transformation East and West
Experiential and Discussion Group with Dr. Jeffrey Rubin
6 weeks – dates TBA

For full training description, follow the link HERE

Silvio Wolf Is Back –
with the Continuing Education Courses at the School of Visual Arts:
Visible and Invisible
& Seeing Is Thinking

For full training description, follow the link HERE

Functional Psycho-Neuro-Biology Lens Basics
For Mental Health Practice

Training with Dr. Inna Rozentsvit
@ Hudson Valley Professional Development
February 7th, 1pm – 4pm EST
Virtual Live – 3 CEs

Register at
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/functional-psycho-neuro-biology-lens-basics-for-mental-health-practice-tickets-493864230207

For full training description, visit the following page:
https://orinyc.org/functional-psycho-neuro-biology-lens-basics-for-mental-health-practice/

May 19-21, June 25-26, and October 8-9

INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOHISTORICAL ASSOCIATION’S 45th ANNUAL CONFERENCE
Group Identity and the Sources of Conflict

Virtual event on Zoom

Political, racial, religious, and other large group identities and belief systems are being challenged as never before in our era of globalization.  Conflicts include white supremacism vs. multicultural solidarity; resurgent patriarchy vs. gender diversity and equality; authoritarianism vs. democracy; science denial (on pandemics and climate change) vs. science-informed policy and activism; and more.  Some of the questions we ask are:

– How should we understand the psychodynamics of conflict in its many forms?
– What are the sources of group identities in childhood experience and later socialization?
– How can we handle conflict to facilitate individual and collective healing?

REGISTRATION AND PAYMENT FORM (CLICK HERE)

May 19-21, 2021

The 44th Annual Convention of the International Psychohistorical Association

IDENTITY AND CONFLICT IN HISTORY, CULTURE AND SOCIETY

May 19-21, 2021 (9:30am – 6pm EDT) Live Virtual Conference

Co-Sponsored by: The Object Relations Institute for Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis

& The New York University, Silver School of Social Work

The world is experiencing historic levels of ideological, racial, class, caste, health, ecological and domestic conflicts. Conflict, in its various enactments, dominates our media, politics, and communities. This annual conference of the International Psychohistorical Association will explore CONFLICT psycho-historically, in its relation to personal and group traumas, identities and constructive and destructive potentialities.

To REGISTER and FOR MORE INFORMATION, Follow the LINK HERE

Earn up to16.5 CE Credits from APA and NYSED Psy

May 1, 2021

American Association for Psychoanalysis in Clinical Social Work (AAPCSW-NY)

LIVE ONLINE (VIRTUAL): LECTURE/DISCUSSION

Saturday, May 1, 2021 Panel Presentation and Discussion 9:30 am – 1:30 pm

For full conference description, follow the link HERE

April 11, 2021

Book Event: Healing, Rebirth and the Work of Michael Eigen

Sunday, April 11th, 11am – 2pm EST

Virtual event. To register contact Ken Fuchsman at

Registration is free, but only those who’d registered will be able to attend

Register here

March 31, 2021

Navigating Anxiety In Children: Meeting Stress with Inner Strength

To learn more and register visit: https://www.eomega.org/online-workshops/navigating-anxiety-in-children?utm_source=jchaffiliate&utm_campaign=Navigating_Anxiety_In_Children&keycode=21WBJCH-A1

In addition, for those that are taking the course, Dr. Victoria Grinman is offering an 8 week live support group for parents, in which she will facilitate a guided discussion about the material in the course and answer any questions you have about it, including helping you apply the information and strategies to your own kiddo(s). Having the support of others is so important and we hope this gives you some relief in knowing that you are not alone.

To register and learn more, visit: https://growingkindminds.com/navigating-anxiety-in-children-meeting-stress-with-inner-strength/

COVID-19 NEWS

COVID-19 – please consider the following GUIDELINES:

1) Self-monitor for COVID-19 symptoms: fever, cough, shortness of breath;
2) Should you detect symptoms, self-isolate for 14 days from initial symptoms;
3) Should your symptoms continue for more than 48 hours or if you are at high risk, contact your healthcare provider for further direction.

While there is still much to learn about COVID-19, we should remain calm and vigilant in our personal efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19 and monitor the CDC and WHO websites for up-to-date local, national, and global information.

For more information please visit the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control

COVID-19: Good News (3-18-20)

October 12, 2019

Workshop: THE CLOSET NARCISSIST: WOODY ALLEN’S “BLUE JASMINE”

Sponsored by the Jungian Analytic Psychology Club and the New Directions Program
Presenter: SUSAN KAVALER-ADLER, PhD, ABPP, D.Litt, NCPsyA
When: Saturday, OCTOBER 12th, 2019, 1-5pm EST
Where: The C.G. Jung Center, 28 E 39th St, New York, NY 10016
Fees: Members & Seniors: $35; Non-members: $45; Students with IDs: $15

Contact 212-557-1502 or

REGISTRATION & INFO

July 14, 2019

Call for Papers, Clio’s Psyche – due 10-01-19

This is the call for papers for Clio’s Psyche re: David Lotto’s article, “A Male Perspective on Sex and Power in the Age of #MeToo.” Clio’s Psyche editors welcome your response to this paper (in a 1000 words, including your title, 7-10 key words, and biography) or your own paper on the subject (up to 2000 words, including your title, abstract, keywords, and biography). The deadline is October 1, 2019, but early submissions are encouraged.

Please send your papers to Clio’s Psyche Editor, Paul H. Elovitz, at

July 29, 2019

Treating Trauma Stress in Kids: Movement, Mindfulness & Yoga – Off the Mat!
with Victoria Grinman, LICSW, CFTP, CA

WHEN: Monday, July 29th 2019 9:00am – 4:30pm
WHERE: Courtyard by Marriott (183-15 Horace Harding Expy, Fresh Meadows, NY 1136)
Flyer link: https://conta.cc/2NfksyI

Registration link

Call for Papers – due 10-31-18
42nd Annual Conference of the International Psychohistorical Association

Theme: The Intersection of Psychology and History
Sub-Theme: The Contributions of Michael Eigen to Human Understanding
When: May 22-24, 2019 (Wednesday-Friday)
Where: New York University (Exact location TBA) or VIRTUAL participation (with minimal tech requirements)

The International Psychohistorical Association is currently accepting papers (for individual presentations and panels) for its 42nd Annual Conference to be held May 22-24, 2019 at New York University.
Interested scholars and clinicians are invited to submit your proposed presentation title and brief abstract for possible inclusion in the IPA 2019 program. Papers should focus on the conference themes or other pertinent topics related to psychohistory, psychology, and history. Typical individual presentations are 60 minutes in length which includes 15 minutes for discussion. Students are encouraged to submit proposals for student panels. Continuing Education Units will be offered for NYS Licensed Social Workers, Psychoanalysts, Mental Health Counselors, and Marriage And Family Therapists.

Due date for proposals: October 31, 2018 Please submit the working title, 50-word abstract, and a short bio to IPA President and Conference Chair Ken Fuchsman at

For more information, visit the CALL for PAPERS page HERE

May-June

41st ANNUAL CONFERENCE of the INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOHISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
Co-sponsored by: The New York University Silver School of Social Work,
the Object Relations Institute for Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis, & NASW-NYS

Conference Theme: The INTERSECTION of PSYCHOLOGY, HISTORY, and CULTURE
When: May 30th – June 1st, 2018 (8:30 am – 5 pm)
Where: New York University, Kimmel Center for University Life; 60 Washington Square South, New York City
VIRTUAL PARTICIPATION (new) will be offered (for those who are not able to attend in person) – via gotomeeting platform, with minimal technical requirements

2018th IPA Annual Conference will bring together psychologists, historians, psychohistorians, social workers, psychiatrists, psychoanalysts, social scientists, and more. Presentations will focus primarily on the intersection of psychology, history, and culture. This conference will offer over 50 presentations, including 40+ presentations bearing CEUs for NYS licensed mental health professions. For more information about this conference, incl. conference fees, cancellation policies, CEU information – follow the link here: http://www.psychohistory.us/conference-and-membership.php or contact the IPA’ president, Ken Fuchsman, directly – at .

More about the CEUs (for four NYS licensed mental health professions), certificates in psychoanalytic training, and professional development certificates – please follow the link HERE.

For full IPA 2018 CONFERENCE SCHEDULE, please follow the link HERE

Learn more about the International Psychohistorical Association by visiting http://www.psychohistory.us/ For 2016 & 2017 IPA conference presentations (titles and abstracts), visit https://orinyc.org/Psychohistory-conf-2016.html & https://orinyc.org/IPA-2017-conference.html

August 10

PRIVATE PRACTICE 101 – Dynamic and Comprehensive Live Webinar
with Victoria Grinman, Founder of Growing Kind Minds, LLC

When: August 10, 2018, 10am – 12:30pm EST. If you can’t make the whole webinar or have a last minute emergency – you will receive a link to view the webinar recording plus the post–webinar group coaching call
Where: Virtual participation – via gotomeeting platform, with minimal technical requirements.

For more information, follow the link HERE

May 19

Shifting shapes of Families: Implications for Theories and Practice
Annual Conference of The Postgraduate Psychoanalytic Society; co-sponsored by MPG Consulting – 6 CEUs

May 19, 2018; 9:30am – 4:30pm
@ Salmagundi Art Club; 47 Fifth Ave (between 11th and 12th Street), NYC

For more information, please visit the web page HERE

To register, please please contact: Nobuko Meaders, LCSW , 212-228-6988

May 8-9

The Problem Gambling Training Partnership Conference

May 8 – 9, 2018 @ SUNY New Paltz; 1 Hawk Drive New Paltz, NY

Free to attend; over 10 CEUs for 5 licensed NYS professions

More info HERE

June 9

TIME MANAGEMENT FROM THE INSIDE OUT: PRIORITIZING PASSIONS — TWO-PART WORKSHOP
WORKSHOP LEADER: SUSAN KAVALER-ADLER, PH.D., ABPP, D.LITT., NCPsyA

5 CEUs
WHEN: SATURDAY JUNE 9th, 2018 10 AM – 4 PM
WHERE: 115 EAST 9TH STREET, 12P; NYC 10003 OR VIRTUALLY
MORNING (10 AM – 1PM): INTERACTIVE LECTURE & DISCUSSION
AFTERNOON (2 PM – 4PM): EXPERIENTIAL GROUP with GUIDED MEDITATION and VISUALIZATION

MORE INFO

April 30

Clio’s Psyche Call for Papers on The Psychology and History of Sexual Violation and its Condemnation

The Spring 2018 Special Feature

The due date is April 30th, 2018

For more information, follow this LINK

April 21

Psychohistory Forum: The Nature of Being Human Seminar @ FordhamU

TOPIC: WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE HUMAN: An INTERDISCIPLINARY and PSYCHOHISTORICAL APPROACH
PRESENTER: KEN FUCHSMAN, EdD (UConn and the IPA)
MODERATOR: JACQUES SZALUTA, PHD (U.S. Merchant Marine Academy)
DATE: APRIL 21, 2018 (Saturday); 9:45 am – 1:00 pm
LOCATION: FORDHAM UNIVERSITY-LINCOLN CENTER, 113 West 60 Street at 9th Ave (room 1019A, 10th floor).

March 10

The NIP 2018 Annual Conference
Shame in the Analytic Encounter

When: Saturday, March 10, 2018 (9:00 am – 3:30 pm)
Where: Kimmel Center, NYU
Presenters: Sandra Buechler, PhD; Jody Messler Davies, PhD; andDan Hill, PhD
Clinical Presentation by Yael Greenberg, PsyD
CEU Info: 4.5 CE contact hours for APA, and NYS Social Workers and Licensed Psychoanalysts

Learn More and Register online

For more information about the presenters, follow this LINK

February 16

BOOK SIGNING at the American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA) NATIONAL MEETING IN NYC

Author: SUSAN KAVALER-ADLER, PhD, ABPP, D.LITT., NCPsyA
When: 2/16/17; 11:30 am -12:30 pm
Where: New York HILTON, BOOK EXHIBIT HALL

For more information, follow this LINK

February 10

Workshop: THE DEMON LOVER COMPLEX vs. the PROCESS OF PSYCHIC INTEGRATION: TWO FEMALE ARTISTS, ANNE SEXTON and SUZANNE FARRELL

Presenter: Susan Kavaler-Adler, Ph.D., ABPP, D.Litt., NCPsyA
When: February 10th, 2018, @ 10am – 2pm
Where: The Analytical Psychology Club @ 28 E 39th St, New York, NY 10016

For more information, visit this page

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