INTEGRATIVE NEUROPSYCHOANALYTIC APPROACH
TO PSYCHIC TRAUMA & POST-TRAUMATIC GROWTH

Virtual Seminar with Dr. Inna Rozentsvit
Date: June 22nd, 2024, 10:00am – 4pm EDT (Saturday)
Location: Virtual participation only!
Virtual participation is conducted via audio/video or audio mode only
(with minimal technical requirements)
To Register for this workshop, please complete the Registration form
Continuing Education Information: 8.5 CE hours for APA, NYS Psychologists, NYS Social Workers (from Amedco);
5.5 CE hours for Licensed Psychoanalysts (from NAAP)
See details here

SEMINAR DESCRIPTION:

What is psychological trauma? It is when our life assumptions are crushed. These assumptions, the scaffolding of our well-being, are: 1) the world is benevolent; 2) the world is meaningful, controllable, predictable, and just (and we are invulnerable); and 3) we are worthy, decent, and “good” people who deserve the “good” happening to us.  (Stephen Joseph)

What is post-traumatic growth (PTG)? In her 3-minute 2010 TED talk, “The best gift I ever survived”, Stacey Kramer, brain cancer survivor, said: “So next time you’re faced with something that’s unexpected, unwanted and uncertain, consider that it just may be a gift.” In Psycho-Neuro-Bio language, it is PTG.

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This seminar will introduce the participants to the integrative neuropsychoanalytic approach of dealing with traumatic situations and traumatic stress, as well as the two main psychological outcomes of trauma – PTSD and PTG. The participants will learn or advance their knowledge of the Functional Psycho-Neuro-Biology Tools® as these are applied to working in trauma-sensitive practice, as well as becoming the Expert Companions in fostering resilience and PTG in those affected by trauma.

Which are the Functional Psycho-Neuro-Biology Tools® that we will explore during this training?

First, we will review the main Brain-Mind processes – neuroplasticity, neurogenesis, neurointegration, synaptic connections & synaptic pruning, neuronetworking/ connectomes, mirror neuron networking, and the electrochemical conduction of information.

Second, we will review the main Brain-Mind phenomena – of brain laterality, “don’t use it – lose it,” “what fires together – wires together,” “regions connected together – grow up together,” and others. We will discuss the Brain-Mind dyad, using Paul MacLean’s Triune Brain theoretical framework, and attachment, stress responses, self-regulation, and epigenetics as these apply to understanding and treating trauma, mental health disorders, as well as various conditions involving the internal organs and systems.

Third, we will look at all these Brain-Mind mechanisms as the functional system (rather than offering the neuroanatomical models), allowing one to explain the “Whys” of our behaviors, predispositions to trauma and various mental and body/organs’ disorders, and what to do with these practically.

In this seminar, we will also explore how to become the Expert Companion to one’s patients, clients, friends, and family, who are affected by traumatic stress or psychological trauma, to nurture their resilience and PTG process.

Case examples will be offered. Participants’ case examples or/and life situations will also be discussed.

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To build an integrative approach, three main steps are highlighted.

(1) To identify and acknowledge paradoxes and ambiguities in psychoanalytic concepts. This constitutes a relevant issue as clinical work is based on hypothetical concepts. If a concept is obscure or entails a theoretical paradox, then its application to clinical work is just as vague or imprecise as the concept.

(2) To integrate knowledge from different fields and perspectives into psychoanalytic theory can contribute to inform psychoanalytic topics and potentially help solve some of the conceptual and clinical problems described before.

(3) To benefit from the already existent integrative attempts in neuropsychoanalysis, both theoretical and clinical. As simple as it may seem, once neuropsychoanalytic knowledge has been developed, the next challenge is to know how to apply it in the clinical situation.

Psychoanalytic theory can benefit from detailed revisions to facilitate more testing of concepts (Kandel, 1999) and an ongoing clarification of how the mind works that in turn may promote more quality in clinical approaches. To that end, Govrin (2006) used Ryle’s concept of “thick descriptions” to convey the need for complex theories of the mind in psychoanalysis. By expressing his concern about not generating new knowledge in psychoanalysis, Govrin highlights the need for the creation of new grand theories of the mind that may explain empirical problems that bring about hypotheses to be tested.

(https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8458959/)

SEMINAR SCHEDULE:

Saturday, June 22nd, 2024

Morning Session:
10am — 12:30pm

Lunch
12:30pm — 1:00pm

Afternoon Session:
1:00pm — 4:00pm

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

At the end of this educational activity, its participants will be able to:

  • Discuss and differentiate the concepts of trauma, traumatic situation/event, and traumatic stress.
  • Discuss and differentiate the psychological outcomes of trauma, such as PTSD/ CPTSD (complex PTSD), coping, resilience, and PTG.
  • Discuss and analyze the brain-mind paradigm shift in trauma-sensitive practice.
  • Discuss and analyze the main Brain-Mind processes – neuroplasticity, neurogenesis, neurointegration, synaptic connections & synaptic pruning, neuronetworking/ connectomes, mirror neuron networking, and the electrochemical conduction of information.
  • Discuss and analyze the main Brain-Mind phenomena – of brain laterality, “don’t use it – lose it,” “what fires together – wires together,” “regions connected together – grow up together,” and others.
  • Discuss and analyze Paul MacLean’s Triune Brain theoretical framework, as it applies to the world of trauma.
  • Discuss and analyze theoretical and practical applications of the fields of attachment, self-regulation, and epigenetics, as these apply to the world of trauma.
  • Discuss and utilize the concept of becoming the Expert Companion to one’s patients, clients, friends, and family, who are affected by trauma, to nurture their PTG process.

READINGS:

  • Dell’Osso, L., Carpita, B., Nardi, B., Bonelli, C., Calvaruso, M., Cremone, I.M. (2023). Biological correlates of Post-Traumatic Growth (PTG): A literature review. Brain Science, 13(2), 305.
  • Dunn, E.C., Solovieff, N., Lowe, S.R., Gallagher, P.J., et al. (2014). Interaction between genetic variants and exposure to Hurricane Katrina on post-traumatic stress and post-traumatic growth: A prospective analysis of low-income adults. Journal of Affective Disorders, 152-154, 243-249.
  • Hubschmid, M., Aybek, S., Maccaferri, G.E., et al. (2015). Efficacy of brief interdisciplinary psychotherapeutic intervention for motor conversion disorder and nonepileptic attacks. Gen Hosp Psychiatry, 37, 448–455.
  • Hutchinson, E. (2011). Neuroplasticity: Functional recovery after stroke. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 12(1), 4.
  • Kandel, E. R. (1998). Biology and the future of psychoanalysis: A new intellectual framework for psychiatry revisited (Special Article). American Journal of Psychiatry, 156(4), 505-524.
  • Kandel, E. R. (1998). A new intellectual framework for psychiatry. American Journal of Psychiatry, 155,457-469.
  • Kandel, E. R. (2012). The age of insight: The quest to understand the unconscious in art, mind, and brain, from Vienna 1900 to the present.Random House.
  • Kandel, E. R. (2016). Reductionism in art and brain science: Bridging the two cultures. Columbia University Press.
  • LeDoux, J. (2003). The emotional brain, fear, and the amygdala. Cell Mol Neurobiology, 23(4-5), 727-38. doi: 10.1023/a:1025048802629. PMID: 14514027.
  • Shonkoff, J. P., & Phillips, D. A. (Eds.). (2000). From neurons to neighborhoods: The science of early childhood development. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.
  • Skolariki, K., Vrahatis, A.G., Krokidis, M.G., Exarchos, T.P., & Vlamos, P. (2023). Assessing and modelling of post-traumatic stress disorder using molecular and functional biomarkers. Biology (Basel) 12(8), 1050.
  • Tedeschi, R. G., & Calhoun, L. G. (1996). The Posttraumatic Growth Inventory: Measuring the positive legacy of trauma. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 9(3), 455–472.

SHORT BIO OF THE SEMINAR LEADER:

Inna Rozentsvit, M.D., PhD, MBA, MSciEd is a neurologist and neurorehabilitation specialist, trained in psychoanalysis and psychotherapy, with extensive experience in brain trauma, autoimmune neurological and neuropsychiatric conditions.
Dr. Rozentsvit is a founder of the Neurorecovery Solutions, Inc. (neurorecoverysolutions.com), a non-profit organization which helps neurologically impaired and their caregivers in their often heart-breaking journey to well-being. She is also an educator who works with children and adults with learning and emotional disabilities, while applying knowledge from the fields of neurology, basic sciences, mental health, and pedagogy to solving puzzles of miscommunications and every-day interactions of these children and adults with their parents and significant others.

Dr. Rozentsvit is passionate about people and supporting the possibilities that all people are. This passion fueled her publishing endeavors, which realized into founding the ORI Academic Press (oriacademicpress.org), the MindMend Publishing Co., and the MindConsiliums (a trans-disciplinary journal with main focus on cross-pollination of knowledge and experience from various mental health, medicine, and science fields, mindconsiliums.org).

Dr. Rozentsvit is the scientific faculty member, programs director, and administrator of the Object Relations Institute for Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy (ORI, www.orinyc.org) in NYC. Her course on Neurobiology for Psychoanalysts and Psychotherapists and the Parent-Child Development Program at the ORI include important for all mental health professionals topics: Neurobiology of Self; Neurochemistry of Emotions; Attachment Theory/ Love before First Sight; Neurological Disorders (Parkinson’s disease, stroke, and multiple sclerosis) through the Eyes of a Psychotherapist; Neurobiology of Psychosomatic Illness; Neuroscience of Anger and Violence; and others.

For more information, please visit https://innarozentsvit.com/

CONTINUING EDUCATION:

Object Relations Institute for Psychotherapy & Psychoanalysis
2024 Spring/Summer Training at ORI
April 4, 2024 – June 22, 2024
Live Online

Joint Accreditation Statement

In support of improving patient care, this activity has been planned and implemented by Amedco LLC and Object Relations Institute for Psychotherapy & Psychoanalysis (ORIPP).  Amedco LLC is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team. Amedco Joint Accreditation #4008163.

Psychologists (APA) Credit Designation

This course is co-sponsored by Amedco and Object Relations Institute for Psychotherapy & Psychoanalysis.  Amedco is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists.  Amedco maintains responsibility for this program and its content.  23.0 hours [for both sessions]. 8.5 hours for session #2.

The following state boards accept courses from APA providers for Counselors: AK, AR, AZ, CA, CO, CT, DC, DE, FL, GA, HI, IA, ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, MD, ME, MO, NC, ND, NH, NE, NJ, NM, NV, OK*, OR, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VA, WI, WY

MI: No CE requirements.
*OK: Accepts APA credit for live, in-person activities but not for ethics and/or online courses.
The following state boards accept courses from APA providers for MFTs:
AK, AR, AZ, CA, CO, CT, DE, FL, GA, IA, ID, IN, KS, MD, ME, MO, NE, NC, NH, NJ, NM, NV, OK*, OR, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VA, WA, WDC, WI, WY
AL MFTs: Credits authorized by NBCC or any other state licensing agency will be accepted.

MA MFTs: Participants can self-submit courses not approved by the MAMFT board for review.

The following state boards accept courses from APA providers for Addictions Professionals: AK, AR, CO, CT, DC, DE, GA, IA, IN, KS, LA, MD, MO, MT, NC, ND, NE, NJ, NM, NY (held outside NY ONLY), OK*, OR, SC, UT, WA, WI, WY
The following state boards accept courses from APA providers for Social Workers:
AK, AR, AZ, CA, CO, DE, FL, GA, ID, IN, KY, ME, MN, MO, NE, NH, NM, OR, PA, VT, WI, WY

New York Board for Social Workers (NY SW)
Amedco SW CPE is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #0115. 23.0 hours [for both sessions]. 8.5 hours for session #2.

New York Board for Psychology (NY PSY)
Amedco is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0031. 23.0 hours [for both sessions]. 8.5 hours for session #2.

National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis (NAAP) is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an Approved Provider of continuing education for Licensed Psychoanalysts. #P‑0019. 5.5 hours.

National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis (NAAP) is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for Licensed Social Workers #SW-0168. 5.5 hours.

To receive CE certificates for the actual hours attended – please request them at the time of registration or any time prior to beginning of the conference. CE certificate fee: $25 (in addition to the registration fees). No fees charged for PD (Professional Development) certificates from ORI.

REGISTRATION AND FEES:

Early Bird registration (before April 17, 2024)
$60 regular/ $40 grad students & candidates/ $20 undergrad students.
If CEs are requested — please use the “regular” registration option. There is an additional fee of $25 (can be paid prior or on the day of the conference).

Regular registration (April 17 – before 6pm EDT/ NYC time on June 21, 2024)
$80 regular/ $50 grad students & candidates/ $25 undergrad students.
If CEs are requested — please use the “regular” registration option. There is an additional fee of $25 (can be paid prior or on the day of the conference).

Registration ‘at the door’ (after 6pm EDT/ NYC time on June 21, 2024)
$90 regular/ $65 grad students & candidates/ $30 undergrad students.
If CEs are requested — please use the “regular” registration option. There is an additional fee of $25 (can be paid prior or on the day of the conference).

Please Note: If CEs are requested — there is an additional fee of $25 (can be paid on the day of the conference or in advance).
If you are requesting the CEs, please register as a licensed practitioner and pay the “regular” fee for attending this educational event.

SPECIAL SCHOLARSHIPS are available for undergraduate and graduate students, as well as for retired or disabled practitioners, or need-based or/and those who live outside of the USA.
SPECIAL SCHOLARSHIPS are available for neurodiverse individuals and their families
To apply for your scholarship, please go to the registration form below.

CANCELLATION POLICY:
Full refund before the date of the event.
No refund from the day of the event, but full paid tuition will be applied to any further ORI events.

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